From the monthly archives: November 2017

Outline for Reflection Paper

The first section of the outline is the introduction, which identifies the subject and gives an overview of your reaction to it. The introduction paragraph ends with your thesis statement, which identifies whether your expectations were met and what you learned. The thesis statement serves as the focal point of your paper. It also provides a transition to the body of the paper and will be revisited in your conclusion.

The body of your paper identifies the three (or more, depending on the length of your paper) major points that support your thesis statement. Each paragraph in the body should start with a topic sentence. The rest of each paragraph supports your topic sentence. Keep in mind that a transition sentence at the end of each paragraph creates a paper that flows logically and is easy to read. When creating the outline, identify the topic sentence for each paragraph, and add the supporting statements, evidence, and your own experiences or reactions to the subject underneath.

The conclusion wraps up your essay, serving as the other bookend in stating and proving your thesis statement. In outlining the conclusion, identify the thesis statement and add the main points from the body paragraphs as a recap. Don’t add new information to the conclusion, and be sure to identify the closing statement of your reflection paper.

A sample outline format should reflect the main points of your paper, from start to finish:

  1. Introduction
  1. Identify and explain subject
  2. State your reaction to the subject
  3. Agree/disagree?
  4. Did you change your mind?
  5. Did the subject meet your expectations?
  6. What did you learn?
  7. Thesis Statement
  1. Body Paragraph 1
  1. Topic Sentence
  2. Supporting evidence 1
  3. Supporting evidence 2
  4. Supporting evidence 3
  1. Body Paragraph 2
  1. Topic Sentence
  2. Supporting evidence 1
  3. Supporting evidence 2
  4. Supporting evidence 3
  1. Body Paragraph 3
  1. Topic Sentence
  2. Supporting evidence 1
  3. Supporting evidence 2
  4. Supporting evidence 3
  1. Conclusion
  1. Recap thesis statement
  2. Recap Paragraph 1
  3. Recap Paragraph 2
  4. Recap Paragraph 3
  5. Conclusion statement

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