From the monthly archives: December 2017

MONDAY, January 8, 2018

 

CLASSROOM:  CREATE A PAGE

PORTFOLIO

Based on your plan for your portfolio start developing your pages each day.  You start with a reasonable goal that you can complete in one afternoon and then execute it by the end of the period.

WRITE YOUR GOAL/REFLECTION FOR TODAY:  

GOAL

Each day you need to write a goal that will be worth 30 points.  You need to have a minimal of 3 sentences using the following questions.

1. What  are you going to work on today?

2. What steps will you take to  get there?

3.  What will I see at the end of the day?

REFLECTION:

• 3 things you learned today?

• If you were not able to reach your goal,  what prevented you from completing your goal?

TUESDAY, January 9, 2018 

CLASSROOM:  CREATE A PAGE

PORTFOLIO

Based on your plan for your portfolio start developing your pages each day.  You start with a reasonable goal that you can complete in one afternoon and then execute it by the end of the period.

WRITE YOUR GOAL/REFLECTION FOR TODAY:  

GOAL

Each day you need to write a goal that will be worth 30 points.  You need to have a minimal of 3 sentences using the following questions.

1. What  are you going to work on today?

2. What steps will you take to  get there?

3.  What will I see at the end of the day?

REFLECTION:

• 3 things you learned today?

• If you were not able to reach your goal,  what prevented you from completing your goal?

WEDNESDAY, January 10, 2018 

CLASSROOM:  CREATE A PAGE

PORTFOLIO

Based on your plan for your portfolio start developing your pages each day.  You start with a reasonable goal that you can complete in one afternoon and then execute it by the end of the period.

WRITE YOUR GOAL/REFLECTION FOR TODAY:  

GOAL

Each day you need to write a goal that will be worth 30 points.  You need to have a minimal of 3 sentences using the following questions.

1. What  are you going to work on today?

2. What steps will you take to  get there?

3.  What will I see at the end of the day?

REFLECTION:

• 3 things you learned today?

• If you were not able to reach your goal,  what prevented you from completing your goal?

THURSDAY, January 11, 2018

CLASSROOM:  CREATE A PAGE

PORTFOLIO

Based on your plan for your portfolio start developing your pages each day.  You start with a reasonable goal that you can complete in one afternoon and then execute it by the end of the period.

WRITE YOUR GOAL/REFLECTION FOR TODAY:  

GOAL

Each day you need to write a goal that will be worth 30 points.  You need to have a minimal of 3 sentences using the following questions.

1. What  are you going to work on today?

2. What steps will you take to  get there?

3.  What will I see at the end of the day?

REFLECTION:

• 3 things you learned today?

• If you were not able to reach your goal,  what prevented you from completing your goal?

FRIDAY, January 12, 2018 

CLASSROOM:  CREATE A PAGE

PORTFOLIO

Based on your plan for your portfolio start developing your pages each day.  You start with a reasonable goal that you can complete in one afternoon and then execute it by the end of the period.

WRITE YOUR GOAL/REFLECTION FOR TODAY:  

GOAL

Each day you need to write a goal that will be worth 30 points.  You need to have a minimal of 3 sentences using the following questions.

1. What  are you going to work on today?

2. What steps will you take to  get there?

3.  What will I see at the end of the day?

REFLECTION:

• 3 things you learned today?

• If you were not able to reach your goal,  what prevented you from completing your goal?

 

MONDAY-FRIDAY: JANUARY 8-12, 2018

Working with 3D Objects and Transparencies to Make a Vector Cola Bottle Design

by
Difficulty:IntermediateLength:MediumLanguages:

VECTORTUTS has covered Illustrator’s 3D effects a few times, so the basics should already be familiar to you. In this tutorial, we’ll be taking those skills up a notch and discussing how Illustrator deals with transparency in 3D objects. In just a few steps you’ll have created a plastic cola bottle, which is ideally suited for those of you involved in product marketing.

This is what we’re looking to build with this tutorial.

We need two symbols for mapping to our final 3D object; a bottle label and some texture for the screw top. Make yours with similar proportions to those shown below and use whatever designs you wish. Group the label components (Objects > Group) to make a label group and also group the top texture components.

One thing to bear in mind is the use of gradients within these symbols. Illustrator will rasterize gradients when applying the symbols to 3D surfaces. This is fine and may well give you the desired effect, but in doing so you’ll limit the scaleability of your final object.

Open the symbols panel (Window > Symbols) and drag each of the two groups into the window. Depending upon which version of Illustrator you’re using, you’ll either be presented with the Symbol Options dialogue automatically, or you may have to double-click the symbols once they’re in the panel.

Either way, enter a name for each of your two symbols within the Symbol Options dialogue and click OK. You may also find it useful to display the Symbols panel as a list (as shown in the image below), which allows you to see the symbol icons plus their assigned names. Existing instances of the symbols on your artboard may now be deleted.

I’m now in Outline mode (Command + Y to switch between Preview and Outline) while working with simple vectors, but you can choose which view mode you prefer.

Use the various drawing tools to form the shapes needed for a silhouette of a cola bottle. Align them all centrally, but don’t worry if the whole thing isn’t perfectly symmetrical, we’re going to slice it down the middle anyway. There are many approaches to preparing shapes for revolving, this way gives you a reasonable impression of the final form before you applied the 3D effect.

Use the Pathfinder tools to join the shapes. Then expand your shapes so you then have one complete object.

Draw a line vertically down the middle of your bottle object. Then align the two together centrally. Now click the Pathfinder’s Divide tool and Expand the result. Your object will have been split neatly in two.

Ungroup the two halves (Objects > Ungroup) and delete one of them. It makes little difference which of the two halves you delete; more on this later.

We’re going to continue splitting our object up, this time with a series of horizontal lines. What we’re aiming for is a collection of pieces so each area of the bottle can have it’s own color and transparency properties.

Start with a line to separate the bottle top from the rest, then one which will begin the label, and another for the plastic underneath the label. Continue with this method until your design matches the image shown below.

Once again we turn to our Pathfinder Tools. You’ve no need to group the horizontal lines together, just select everything on the page and click Divide. Expand your object as you’ve done before. Then ungroup (Object > Ungroup) to release your bottle sections from each other.

Use the Direct Selection Tool to select four of the nodes along the edge of your object (as highlighted below). Then press Delete to remove them. This should leave you with a segmented vector defining the outer edge of half of your bottle.

If you’re currently working in Outline mode, switch to Preview (Command + Y) so we can determine some colors. Give each of the five bottle sections a color and leave the stroke width at it’s default of 1px (the stroke width will effectively determine the thickness of your bottle’s plastic, you may want to play around with this).

Select all your bottle sections and group them together (Object > Group). This is a simple but crucial stage in the 3D revolving process. We want all the sections to be treated as one unit and for the effects to be applied to the group as a whole. Without grouping them, the revolve effect would be applied to each section individually, creating five random 3D objects. Try it for yourself!

Select your now grouped bottle vectors. Go to Effect > 3D > Revolve and click Preview in the Options dialogue that appears. You’ll be presented with a revolved 3D rendering of your vector, turned 360° around the left edge by default.

This brings us back to Step 5 when I mentioned “more on this later.” Well later is here now. When I split the whole bottle object into two halves I chose to delete the right hand side, leaving me with the left. If you did the same, your bottle will have rendered as below.

You’ll need to alter the settings so that the object is revolved around the right hand side, as shown in the second image below.

Within the 3D Revolve Options dialogue click on Map Art, which opens the Mapping dialogue. Select the surfaces you need using the surface navigation arrows and map the appropriate symbols to them from the symbols dropdown. There will be a lot of surfaces to choose from with a complex object like this, so it may take a while to find the ones you’re after. This is particularly true when revolving a vector, as surfaces on the inside of your object can also be mapped.

Click Shade Artwork then click on OK. Once back in the 3D Options dialogue, play around with the angle, perspective, and lighting (under More Options) until you’re happy with the result. Then click OK.

We now have a nice 3D bottle with a label and a bit of lid texture, but the plastic and the cola is opaque; we need to resolve the issue of transparency (here comes the most important part of the tutorial). There are several ways in which you may think to approach this, so I’ll first cross off the incorrect ways, and then demonstrate how it should be done.

1. By selecting the 3D bottle and reducing the opacity in the transparency panel the whole object will fade. Furthermore, you won’t even be able to see the reverse side of the object, it will have been treated as a 2D image. This is because when Illustrator renders an object in 3D it first flattens the transparency of that object (see the first image below).

2. Instead we could expand the group in the Layers panel or double click the object to reveal the group elements. By selecting just those we need and altering their opacity we can give our bottle a transparent look (see the second image below). The correct approach! Right? Wrong!

Technically we’ve just achieved the look we wanted, but in terms of best practices this method isn’t going to win a gold star. Illustrator has flattened the transparency of the main object (in this case the group of vectors) though now we’ve altered the properties of an object within our group. This transparency isn’t flattened and the effect works.

However, imagine that we didn’t have a group. Imagine instead that we’d built a single vector to make a green glass bottle and we also wanted to apply a transparency. We wouldn’t have a group to expand, yet we’d still need to alter the transparency of an element within our vector, so this is where the third correctmethod comes into play.

3. Open your Appearance panel (Window > Appearance) and use the Direct Selection tool to click on a vector whose transparency you wish to alter. In the Appearance panel you can now isolate this object’s stroke transparency properties. You do this by clicking on the Stroke attribute and changing the value in the transparency panel. You aren’t altering the properties of the object, but the properties of it’s stroke, which is as far down the properties hierarchy as possible! Guaranteed transparency!

Give the strokes of the plastic sections a Multiply Transparency of 40% and the stroke of the cola section a Multiply transparency of 60%.

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If you feel the bottle needs to be standing on something, make an ellipse, give it a radial gradient from 50% black to white and scale it vertically, as in the image below. Position it underneath the base of the bottle. Make another (larger) ellipse, give it a radial gradient from 20% black to white. Then Mask (Command + 7) the top half with a rectangle. Position it behind the bottle as a horizon.

Unfortunately, Illustrator doesn’t (yet) cater for ambience such as dedicated 3D programs, so you’ll have to fake your own shadow.

There we have it! A transparent 3D plastic cola bottle! Duplicate your final bottle if you want to really demonstrate it’s transparency. Scale it to allow for distance. Bear in mind that when altering the scale of 3D rendered objects (or the stroke width, etc.) your image mapping may need to be reapplied. It’s likely that your surfaces will have been assigned different numbers and that your symbols are attached in different places.

 

MONDAY, December 18, 2017

 

CLASSROOM:  CREATE A PAGE

PORTFOLIO

Based on your plan for your portfolio start developing your pages each day.  You start with a reasonable goal that you can complete in one afternoon and then execute it by the end of the period.

WRITE YOUR GOAL/REFLECTION FOR TODAY:  

GOAL

Each day you need to write a goal that will be worth 30 points.  You need to have a minimal of 3 sentences using the following questions.

1. What  are you going to work on today?

2. What steps will you take to  get there?

3.  What will I see at the end of the day?

REFLECTION:

• 3 things you learned today?

• If you were not able to reach your goal,  what prevented you from completing your goal?

TUESDAY, December 19, 2017 

CLASSROOM:  CREATE A PAGE

PORTFOLIO

Based on your plan for your portfolio start developing your pages each day.  You start with a reasonable goal that you can complete in one afternoon and then execute it by the end of the period.

WRITE YOUR GOAL/REFLECTION FOR TODAY:  

GOAL

Each day you need to write a goal that will be worth 30 points.  You need to have a minimal of 3 sentences using the following questions.

1. What  are you going to work on today?

2. What steps will you take to  get there?

3.  What will I see at the end of the day?

REFLECTION:

• 3 things you learned today?

• If you were not able to reach your goal,  what prevented you from completing your goal?

WEDNESDAY, December 20, 2017 

CLASSROOM:  CREATE A PAGE

PORTFOLIO

Based on your plan for your portfolio start developing your pages each day.  You start with a reasonable goal that you can complete in one afternoon and then execute it by the end of the period.

WRITE YOUR GOAL/REFLECTION FOR TODAY:  

GOAL

Each day you need to write a goal that will be worth 30 points.  You need to have a minimal of 3 sentences using the following questions.

1. What  are you going to work on today?

2. What steps will you take to  get there?

3.  What will I see at the end of the day?

REFLECTION:

• 3 things you learned today?

• If you were not able to reach your goal,  what prevented you from completing your goal?

THURSDAY, December 21, 2017 

CLASSROOM:  CREATE A PAGE

PORTFOLIO

Based on your plan for your portfolio start developing your pages each day.  You start with a reasonable goal that you can complete in one afternoon and then execute it by the end of the period.

WRITE YOUR GOAL/REFLECTION FOR TODAY:  

GOAL

Each day you need to write a goal that will be worth 30 points.  You need to have a minimal of 3 sentences using the following questions.

1. What  are you going to work on today?

2. What steps will you take to  get there?

3.  What will I see at the end of the day?

REFLECTION:

• 3 things you learned today?

• If you were not able to reach your goal,  what prevented you from completing your goal?

FRIDAY, December 22, 2017 

CLASSROOM:  CREATE A PAGE

PORTFOLIO

Based on your plan for your portfolio start developing your pages each day.  You start with a reasonable goal that you can complete in one afternoon and then execute it by the end of the period.

WRITE YOUR GOAL/REFLECTION FOR TODAY:  

GOAL

Each day you need to write a goal that will be worth 30 points.  You need to have a minimal of 3 sentences using the following questions.

1. What  are you going to work on today?

2. What steps will you take to  get there?

3.  What will I see at the end of the day?

REFLECTION:

• 3 things you learned today?

• If you were not able to reach your goal,  what prevented you from completing your goal?

 

ILLUSTRATION 1

How to Create a Winter City Scene in Adobe Illustrator

by
Difficulty:IntermediateLength:LongLanguages:
Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Winter is coming! It’s time to enjoy the wonderful holiday Christmas atmosphere, walk on snowy streets and listen to Christmas songs while looking at the lights, garlands and decorations of beautiful European cities.

In this tutorial, we will let the Christmas magic fill our imagination and create a festive city street illustration.

As always, you can skip the tutorial and grab the result as a part of my Christmas Travel Winter Backgrounds collection. And look for even more Christmas spirit on GraphicRiver.

Christmas Travel Winter Backgrounds set on Graphicriver

First we need to set up a New Document (File > New or Control-N) with these settings:

  • Number of Artboards: 1
  • Width: 1200
  • Height: 1200
  • Units: pixels

From the Advanced tab:

  • Color Mode: RGB
  • Raster Effects: Screen
  • Preview Mode: Default
  • Uncheck Align New Objects to Pixel Grid
Creating a new document

Before we start building our first house, make sure you have the Smart Guides (View > Smart Guides) turned on. This option will help us to move and place objects more easily.

Then create a 224 x 395 px light blue #579dfe rectangle with the help of the Rectangle Tool (M) for the main shape of our building.

Build one more 224 x 50 px shape (#754a3d) and put it on the bottom part of the larger one, aligning to its center.

Building two rectangles

Create a small brown (#8a5e48) rectangle which will act as a brick. Spread the bricks over the bottom brown part of the building by copying and dragging them, imitating the texture.

Adding bricks

Let’s start to build a window by creating a 33 x 75 px rectangle which we will fill with #bad4f7.

Select it and go to Object > Path > Offset Path. Set the Offset value to -3 px, adding a smaller shape inside. Set the shape color to #4a5c5e.

Forming a rectangle with outline

Select the light outer shape and use the Offset Path method again, setting the Offset to 5 px to create an outline. Color it with blue #447cc9. (1)

Add a narrow stripe of 3 px width dividing our window into two halves. Create one more horizontal line of the same width, placing it on the top half of the window. (2)

Keeping the horizontal line selected, choose the Reflect Tool (O). Holding the Alt key, click on the center of the vertical stripe. In the Reflect option window, set the Axis to Horizontal and press Copy, reflecting the shape to the bottom half of the window. (3)

Group (Control-G) all the parts together.

Rendering a large window

In addition to the larger one, we need a smaller window for the house.

Build a 33 x 52 px rectangle of #bad4f7 color.

Using the Offset Path option and the same colors as in the previous step, add a dark inner shape, blue outline, and crossed vertical and horizontal stripes to the window.

Creating a small window

Let’s move on and place windows on the house shape.

Take the larger window and drag it to the middle of the large blue rectangle. Keeping the shape selected and holding both the Shift and the Alt keys, drag the window right, creating a copy on the right side.

To get one more copy in the same direction on the left side, just select the first window and press Enter. The Move option window appears. Add the “” symbol before the Horizontal value without changing the value itself and press Copy.

Creating a row of windows

Create three more windows on the top part of the building.

Then add two smaller windows on the bottom part, leaving an empty space in the middle for the entrance.

Spreading the windows over facade

Time to create an entrance door.

Build a 60 x 119 px rectangle (#8a5e48) and go to Object > Path > Offset Path, setting the Offset value to 10 px. Change the outline color to #447cc9.

Add a horizontal rectangle (#4a5c5e) on the top part of the inner shape for the door window.

Building a door

Let’s add some details to the door by creating a horizontal stripe (#6e4539) right under the bottom outline of the door window. Then place a thinner vertical line of the same color on the middle of the brown part of the door, dividing the door in two parts.

Build one more rectangle for the snowy threshold (#b3def5), aligning it to the bottom part of the door. Select the two upper anchors with the Direct Selection Tool (A) and pull the circle indicators to the center, making the corners rounded.

Finishing the door

Group (Control-G) all the door pieces together and place the door on the house, aligning to its bottom edge.

Take the Direct Selection Tool (A) and, holding Shift, drag the bottom edge of the blue door outline up, placing it on the same level as the top edge of the brown brick part.

Placing the door on the building

Add several thin stripes going across the top and bottom edges of the windows, making the facade more detailed.

Creating decorative stripes

Time to create a roof for our house.

Build a 234 x 140 px rectangle of #b3def5 color on the top of the building, overlapping the house’s top edge, and slightly round the corners.

Copy the roof shape and click Control-B to get a Duplicate behind the main object. Move it down by a few pixels using the Arrow key and change the color to dark blue (#4075bd), creating a shadow effect.

Duplicate the main blue wall shape. Then select both the wall copy and the roof copy using the Intersect function of the Pathfinder to cut the shape. Now the shadow looks natural.

Drawing a roof

Many old European houses have mansard windows, and I really like this architectural detail. Let’s add two mansard windows to our building.

Just create a narrow white rectangle and rotate it by holding the Shift key. Take the Reflect Tool (O), and then Alt-click on the top anchor point of our shape. In the Rotate panel, set the Angle to 90° and click the Copy button. Make both shapes fully rounded and move them closer to each other. Merge the rounded rectangle into one shape using the Unite option of Pathfinder. This shape will act as a snow cap on the top of our window.

Create a small blue rectangle underneath.

Starting build a mansard window

Select both shapes with the Selection Tool (V), hold the Alt key, and click on the blue shape. The selection becomes thicker, indicating you’re now aligning to the Key Object. Head to the Align panel and click the Horizontal Align Center button.

Take the Pen Tool (P) and draw a triangle-like shape (#4075bd) which sits right on the top edge of the blue shape and overlaps the angled white shape.

Select the white angled shape and go to Object > Arrange > Bring to Front, placing it in front of the other parts.

Adding triangle shape and aligning snow cape

Create a small window inside the blue rectangle in the same way as we did before, using the Offset function and the Rectangle Tool (M).

Group (Control-G) all the mansard window pieces together and create a mirror copy on the left part of the roof, by taking the Reflect Tool (O) and clicking on the center of the roof while holding the Alt button.

Add white rounded rectangles underneath each facade window for snowy window ledges. The first house is ready!

Adding a window and a second mansard Building snowy ledges

Let’s move to the next grey building with the rounded roof.

Start by making a 225 x 395 px rectangle of #4a5c5e color. Create one more 145 x 90 px shape of the same color, placing it over the top edge of the larger one and aligning to its center. Select the two upper corners, make them fully rounded, and then merge the two shapes into one with the help of the Uniteoption on the Pathfinder panel.

Building grey rectangle and top rounded part

Use the Offset path method to add a decorative rim around the building. Set the color to #9ec5c9. Drag the bottom edge of the rim to the top flat edge of the house shape. Align the outstanding rim edges to the main house base by dragging them with the Direct Selection Tool (A).

Adding a decorative rim on the top part

Create a rounded door with a staircase on the bottom part. Use the Live Corners feature to round the door’s top, the Offset method to create a rim around it, and simple rectangles for the stairs. Use #8a5e48 for the main door color, #6e4539 for the darker brown, and #7c9b9e for the light grey.

Place three decorative stripes (#7c9b9e) on the house facade behind the door group. Add a horizontal ledge (#9ec5c9) over the entrance and spread two more copies of it over the building facade, leaving empty spaces for the future windows.

Place a gentle shadow under the bottom ledge, making the facade more three-dimensional. Fill the shadow shape with #4a5c5e, and switch its Blending Mode to Multiply in the Transparency panel, while lowering the Opacity to 40%.

Creating the door decorative stripes and a shadow

Form a small window in the same way as we did for the previous house, using the Rectangle Tool (M) and the Offset path option. Use #b3def5 color for the window and #7c9b9e for the window frame.

Create small decorative rectangles around the window, filling them with #9ec5c9. Add a thin horizontal shape of the same color for the window ledge on the bottom part.

To give the ledge a more classic style, make a circle over the ledge, aligning to its center. Select the ledge and the top circle and cut off the top part of the circle by Alt-clicking on it with the Shape Builder Tool (Shift-M). Merge both shapes into one with the Unite option of Pathfinder.

Add a white rounded rectangle overlapping the ledge, which will act as a snow cap. Group (Control-G) all the parts together.

Forming a window

Spread the window groups over the building. Create two smaller rectangular windows and one circular window on the top part of the facade.

Form two grey columns (#7c9b9e) under the decorative rim and then add snow caps on the horizontal ledges using white rounded rectangles.

Take the Pen Tool (P) and create the angled shape for the half of the snowy roof (#b3def5) on the left side of the building. Round the roof corner and, keeping the shape selected, create a mirror reflection of it on the right side by Alt-clicking on the top building anchor with the Reflect Tool (O). Don’t forget to set the Axis to Vertical and press Copy in the end, as we did before.

The grey building is finished. Group (Control-G) all its pieces together.

Spreading windows over the building making a roof and snowy ledges

Time to make the last building with a stepped roof.

Create a 235 x 430 px rectangle of #ffc45c color. Start forming the roof by placing a horizontal rectangle on the top edge, making it shorter at the edges. Add two more rectangles, one above the other, making each one shorter than the previous.

Place a 235 x 140 px rectangle (#822b1a) on the bottom of the building for the ground floor. Add a narrow ledge (#e66340) above its top edge.

Creating stepped shape and ground floor rectangle

Copy the window from the first blue house, and make its outside part wider while making the window itself shorter at the top and bottom edges. Change the colors using #e66340 for the red outside part, #7c9b9e for the glass, and #4a5c5e for the window frame.

Add a white ellipse on the top part of the window, create a line which goes across the ellipse shape above its center, and use the Divide option of Pathfinder while selecting the line and the ellipse. Delete the bottom half of the shape, forming a snow cap.

Add a white rounded rectangle on the bottom part of the window for a snowy ledge. Group (Control-G) all the parts together.

Make more copies of the windows and arrange them on the facade in any symmetrical position which you find interesting.

Creating and copying the windows

Render the large window for the ground floor.

Most of the manipulations will be the same as for the previous objects. Start by creating a 64 x 64 rectangle for the window glass (#7c9b9e). With the help of the Offset method, add two outlines to it, using #754a3d for the lighter brown and #5b1b14 for the darker. Add a vertical narrow stripe, finishing the window frame.

Click on the window glass and create simple curtains of the darker color with the Pen Tool (P), cutting off the outstanding parts with the Shape Builder Tool (Shift-M).

Start to create a sunshade by building a red (#e84b4a) rectangle, making the top corners rounded. Add a few vertical stripes (#e8dddd) on the sunshade, cutting off the unwanted pieces, and place a gentle shadow under its edge.

Add a snow cap to the top of the sunshade and a snowy ledge to its bottom. Then Group (Control-G) the objects.

Building a large window with a sunshade

Create a copy of the window on the left side, change its color to yellow (#ffb636), and build a simple fir tree to add a Christmas feeling. Set the colors of the fir tree and the curtains to the darker yellow.

Click on the main yellow shape and create a simple angled shadow (#eba04b) with the Pen Tool (P).

Finish the building by placing orange (#e66340) bricks here and there as well as ledges above the top edges of the stepped roof.

Control (Control-G) all the parts together.

Adding second window a shadow and decorative bricks

Let’s line up our houses and add a 1200 x 1200 px rectangle (#94cdeb) for the background. Use the Align panel to align the buildings at the bottom.

Aligning the houses and adding blue background

Change the roof colors of the blue and grey houses to white, adding more contrast to the illustration. Change the color of the snow caps on the mansard windows to the darker blue.

Create a white rounded rectangle for the ground level and make a subtle shadow on the bottom by creating a copy (#b3def5) behind it and moving it down by a few pixels.

Draw simple silhouettes of other buildings (#87c0de) behind the houses with the Pen Tool (P), adding more depth to the illustration.

Rendering background buildings and ground level

With the help of simple shapes and the Pen Tool (P), create a street lantern and color it using the following settings:

  • #4a5c5e for the darker grey
  • #586e70 for the lighter grey
  • #ffb636 for the yellow glass
  • #d49322 for the lamp

Drag the lantern on the illustration, placing it on the left side near the blue house, and make another copy on the right side near the yellow building.

Creating a lantern

Let’s make our lanterns shine.

Just create a white circle behind one of the lanterns and fill it with radial gradient from white to black, switching its Blending Mode to Screen. Double-click on the bottom-left gradient slider and change the white color to yellow (#feb02a).

Then move the top-left gradient slider slightly to the right. Copy the gradient, placing it behind the second lantern.

Adding lighting to the lantern

Now we’ll create a snowflake. Draw the main form using the Pen Tool (P) and the image below as a reference (1). Use #daeffa for the coloring.

To add the rounded top part, just create a rounded rectangle and delete its top half with the help of the Direct Selection Tool (A). (2)

Group (Control-G) all the parts. Take the Rotate Tool (R) and click on the bottom anchor while holding the Alt button. Enter 90 for the Angle value and press Copy. Keeping the copy selected, press Control-D twice, creating two more copies and finishing the snowflake. (3) Group (Control-G) all the parts together.

Copying and varying the sizes, spread the snowflakes over our scene to form a well-balanced composition. Add a few circles to imitate smaller snowflakes.

Forming a snowflakes
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Take a look at your winter scene and see if there’s anything else you’d like to create—maybe an extra snow cap, some more details on the houses, or light from the windows.

I chose to add more Christmas spirit to the illustration and created classic holiday symbols, such as a wreath, garlands, bells, a pine tree, and some other decorations. Also I added a few snow caps to the stepped roof of the yellow house.

Creating finishing details

Great job! We’ve managed to create a trendy flat-style winter city scene. Now we are ready for the Christmas holidays!

This illustration is only a part of my Christmas Travel Winter Backgrounds collection. And look for even more Christmas illustrations on GraphicRiver.

Christmas Travel Winter Backgrounds set on Graphicriver

I hope you have enjoyed the process and learned some useful tips and tricks for your future illustrations.

Feel free to share how your project turned out or ask questions in the comments below. Happy Christmas holidays!

winter house scene

 ILLUSTRATION 2

Create a Slam Dunk Cat With Textured Background in Illustrator

by
Difficulty:AdvancedLength:ShortLanguages:
Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

8th August is International Cat Day… in celebration, we’ve republished one of our favourite cat themed tutorials from our archives. This was originally published in March 2014, but the process and tools are still relevant now. Enjoy!

In this tutorial I’m going to show you how to create a unique background texture for my slam dunking cat, as well as some great tips along the way to improve your illustration work in Adobe Illustrator.

In order to complete this tutorial, you will need the following image:

I first begin sketching my concept. I use the Pencil Tool (N) and use a fine Stroke Weight for this, about 0.001in.

Due to the thickness of the strokes, it shouldn’t distract when it is used when adding colors and volume to your render, even when zoomed in.

For convenience, I put the drawing in it’s own layer and it will be placed above all my new layers. When the picture is ready, you can delete the sketch.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

Group together the line work (Control-G) and then change the Blending Mode to Multiply. This will make it easier to see on top of your rendering.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

Although I want the cat to be the focus of the viewers attention, I’d like to introduce a subtle crowd texture in the background. So after searching for an appropriate image, I’ve found this great image by Jmrosenfeld on Flickr. I will be Live Tracing this image to help with the texture.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

After applying Live Trace, go to Object > Live Trace > Tracing Options. I’ve used the settings below to create a low fidelity trace of the photo.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

Let’s release the image from the Live Trace object by going to Object > Expand. Tick all options available and click on OK.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

Using the Magic Wand Tool with the tolerance set to 3 to 10, select colors which are similar to each other. Then in the Pathfinder panel, select Unite. This will not only free some RAM on your computer but will also create a texture of minimalist light and shadow silhouettes, while still keeping a rough edge to your shapes.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

Using the Magic Wand Tool again, select areas which contain unnecessary detailing and delete them.

I’ve then changed the colors for some of the shapes so we’re left with minimal colors in the texture.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial
Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

I like to add gradients to my backgrounds and then use the Eraser Tool to remove any parts I don’t want from the texture.

I want the center of the texture to be a lot more focused, with it fading out towards the top. This will help create a greater sense of depth. I’ll be doing this with Radial Gradients.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

To create a more dynamic background, I’m going to use sharp contrasts on the paw and tail in front of the image. In order to bring more focus to this, I’m going to delete any distracting details and use gradients to soften the texture.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

I then use a light gradient with Blending Mode Screen to emphasis the back board to create further focus on the cat.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

I copied the crowd texture from the layers below. Then I delete some unnecessary parts, put the crowd texture to the front and apply Blending Mode Hard Light. Now the crowd has got more volume and looks more lively.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

You don’t always have to draw everything from scratch. I’m using a basketball from a previous illustration I’ve done and added it to this illustration.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial
Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

Decide where the light is coming from and how this will affect your character. From this begin adding light and shadowed areas to the illustration.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

I defined the body parts that are not lit with a medium shadow color. One of the main painting principles is that the light areas should be warm, then the shadows should be expressed through cold colors. And vise versa; if the light is cold, then the colors used for the shadows should be warm.

When coloring, don’t be afraid to go beyond the lines of the drawing, paint freely and with expression. Later you can just separate the layer with the cat from the background and the crowd texture and delete everything you don’t need with the Eraser Tool.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

To make the work with Eraser Tool easier and less time-consuming, just adjust the setting to make it more sensitive to the touch if you’re using a graphics tablet.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

Mistakes are more obvious from a distance. From time to time, zoom out from your illustration and observe the composition as a whole rather than loads of zoomed in parts.

I found by doing this, my illustration is too bright in contrast and lacking in other colors. So to correct this I go to Edit > Edit Colors > Adjust Color Balance. I then adjusted the shades and color saturation.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial
Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

Now I begin working on the details. To put the paw and the tail forward, I gave them more contrast through the use of gradients. This helps them stand out more. I’ve used a contrasting blue-green color on the tail and foot to help differ the color in comparison to the colors used in the body.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

I’m going to create a brush to use when drawing the contours and when creating clean lines. So go to the Brushes panel and click on New Brush > New Calligraphic Brush. Use the settings below and click on OK.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

Continue adding colors to your composition. Be careful when using shades of blue as this will pull a lot of attention due to it’s contrast to the other colors in the illustration. When using this contrasting color, opt for gradient fills as these have a much softer edge to them.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

When working with a vector which is as complex as this, you should always arrange your layers and keep them organized so you can hide the ones not required when focusing on another. This will help cut down on your file being so heavy to work with.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

Focus the detailing on objects which are closer to the viewer, in terms of perspective. Any details in the background will be lost and only clutter the foreground.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial
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Illustrator has a lot of great free brushes within it’s libraries. I’ve used the ink splatter Art and Scatter brushes over the top of this composition to add a subtle grungy texture.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial

There we have our slam dunk cat! I hope you’ve enjoyed this tutorial and picked up some great tips to improve your own work.

Basketball Cat Vector Tutorial
 

one_kings_lane_michael_smith_office_tour_011

MONDAY: December 18, 2017

CLASSROOM/COMPUTER LAB:

DESIGN THINKING IDEAS

Students will select a specific product (the brand) and write about it.  For example If it is a tennis shoe make it specific such as Nike, Air Jordan and model name.  First sketch the object and write about it in your sketchbook.

1. Sketch the image in your sketchbook

2. Describe the product

3. Talk about what you like about it

4. Talk about  the problems  you find with the product

5. Talk about what you  would do to improve it. After you have written this in your sketchbook write it in WORD and upload it to the website in the COMMENT section at the bottom of the page this week. 

CLASSWORK LAB: CONSTRUCTING A ROOM

CLASSROOM DEMO: MODEL MAKING

Building the Model

1.Measure, mark and cut the foam core to the appropriate wall height for the first exterior wall using the straightedge, architect’s scale, utility knife and pencil with eraser.

2. Using the drafted floor plan on the base as a guide, mark off the appropriate length of the first exterior wall with the pencil. Remember to mark the location, width and height for any doors and windows.

3. Place the first foam core exterior wall on top of the cutting mat. Using the straightedge as a guide, cut the wall to length with the utility knife. Then, keeping the foam core wall on the cutting mat, follow the markings to cut out any windows and doors using the utility knife and straightedge.

4. Apply white glue to the edge of the first foam core exterior wall. Press firmly onto the base.

5. Using masking tape, secure the first wall by applying short strips at a 90-degree angle to the outside of the wall.

6. Continue Steps 1 through 4 for each wall, moving from one side of the model to the other, until the model is complete. Attach subsequent walls to each other with glue along the edges and apply masking tape to hold them in place.

7. Remove the masking tape after the glue dries and sets — about an hour.

Things You Will Need

• Paper

• Pencil with eraser

• Tape measure

• T-square

• Adjustable triangle

•  Architect scale

• 1/8-inch foam core (For ¼-inch scale model)

• Self-healing cutting mat

• Metal straightedge with cork backing

• Utility knife

• White glue

• Masking tape

Tip

Always cut at a 90-degree angle to make the edge of the foam core easier to glue to the base and adjacent pieces.

For a model with a nicer finish, consider using basswood.

Warning

Change blades often to maintain a sharp surface. It’s easier to cut the foam core and will help prevent accidental injuries.

RUBRIC FOR MODEL MAKING

Transferring the Floor Plan

1. Decide what scale you will build the model: 1/4 inch (1/4-inch scale means that on your model, 1/4 inch equals 1 foot), 1/8 inch or 1/16 inch.

2. Calculate the total dimensions of the model, based on scale. For instance, if you are building a model that is 40 by 30 feet at 1/4-inch scale, your model will be 10 by 7 1/2 inches. Your base should be about 12 by 9 1/2 inches or larger, leaving a 2-inch edge around the model.

3. Place the foam core on top of the cutting mat. Measure and mark the appropriate size shape for the base on the foam core using the T-square, adjustable triangle, architect scale and pencil with eraser. Place the straightedge along the area to be cut, and, using the utility knife, cut the base to size.

4. Draft a floor plan of the sketch dimensions onto the foam core base using the same materials. Include all door openings, hallways and windows. Remember to add a width for the walls. Six-inch-thick walls should be sufficient on the floor plan in most cases.

REFLECTION: WHAT DID YOU LEARN?

1. Where did you have problems?

2. Were you able to solve the problem and how did you go about it if you did.

3.  Talk about what could be a better solution to the problem.

TUESDAY: December 19, 2017

CLASSROOM/COMPUTER LAB:

DESIGN THINKING IDEAS

Students will select a specific product (the brand) and write about it.  For example If it is a tennis shoe make it specific such as Nike, Air Jordan and model name.  First sketch the object and write about it in your sketchbook.

1. Sketch the image in your sketchbook

2. Describe the product

3. Talk about what you like about it

4. Talk about  the problems  you find with the product

5. Talk about what you  would do to improve it. After you have written this in your sketchbook write it in WORD and upload it to the website in the COMMENT section at the bottom of the page this week. 

CLASSWO

Building the Model

1.Measure, mark and cut the foam core to the appropriate wall height for the first exterior wall using the straightedge, architect’s scale, utility knife and pencil with eraser.

2. Using the drafted floor plan on the base as a guide, mark off the appropriate length of the first exterior wall with the pencil. Remember to mark the location, width and height for any doors and windows.

3. Place the first foam core exterior wall on top of the cutting mat. Using the straightedge as a guide, cut the wall to length with the utility knife. Then, keeping the foam core wall on the cutting mat, follow the markings to cut out any windows and doors using the utility knife and straightedge.

4. Apply white glue to the edge of the first foam core exterior wall. Press firmly onto the base.

5. Using masking tape, secure the first wall by applying short strips at a 90-degree angle to the outside of the wall.

6. Continue Steps 1 through 4 for each wall, moving from one side of the model to the other, until the model is complete. Attach subsequent walls to each other with glue along the edges and apply masking tape to hold them in place.

7. Remove the masking tape after the glue dries and sets — about an hour.

Things You Will Need

• Paper

• Pencil with eraser

• Tape measure

• T-square

• Adjustable triangle

•  Architect scale

• 1/8-inch foam core (For ¼-inch scale model)

• Self-healing cutting mat

• Metal straightedge with cork backing

• Utility knife

• White glue

• Masking tape

Tip

Always cut at a 90-degree angle to make the edge of the foam core easier to glue to the base and adjacent pieces.

For a model with a nicer finish, consider using basswood.

Warning

Change blades often to maintain a sharp surface. It’s easier to cut the foam core and will help prevent accidental injuries.

RUBRIC FOR MODEL MAKING

Transferring the Floor Plan

1. Decide what scale you will build the model: 1/4 inch (1/4-inch scale means that on your model, 1/4 inch equals 1 foot), 1/8 inch or 1/16 inch.

2. Calculate the total dimensions of the model, based on scale. For instance, if you are building a model that is 40 by 30 feet at 1/4-inch scale, your model will be 10 by 7 1/2 inches. Your base should be about 12 by 9 1/2 inches or larger, leaving a 2-inch edge around the model.

3. Place the foam core on top of the cutting mat. Measure and mark the appropriate size shape for the base on the foam core using the T-square, adjustable triangle, architect scale and pencil with eraser. Place the straightedge along the area to be cut, and, using the utility knife, cut the base to size.

4. Draft a floor plan of the sketch dimensions onto the foam core base using the same materials. Include all door openings, hallways and windows. Remember to add a width for the walls. Six-inch-thick walls should be sufficient on the floor plan in most cases.

REFLECTION: WHAT DID YOU LEARN?

1. Where did you have problems?

2. Were you able to solve the problem and how did you go about it if you did.

3.  Talk about what could be a better solution to the problem.

 WEDNESDAY: December 20, 2017

CLASSROOM : MODEL MAKING

Building the Model

1.Measure, mark and cut the foam core to the appropriate wall height for the first exterior wall using the straightedge, architect’s scale, utility knife and pencil with eraser.

2. Using the drafted floor plan on the base as a guide, mark off the appropriate length of the first exterior wall with the pencil. Remember to mark the location, width and height for any doors and windows.

3. Place the first foam core exterior wall on top of the cutting mat. Using the straightedge as a guide, cut the wall to length with the utility knife. Then, keeping the foam core wall on the cutting mat, follow the markings to cut out any windows and doors using the utility knife and straightedge.

4. Apply white glue to the edge of the first foam core exterior wall. Press firmly onto the base.

5. Using masking tape, secure the first wall by applying short strips at a 90-degree angle to the outside of the wall.

6. Continue Steps 1 through 4 for each wall, moving from one side of the model to the other, until the model is complete. Attach subsequent walls to each other with glue along the edges and apply masking tape to hold them in place.

7. Remove the masking tape after the glue dries and sets — about an hour.

Things You Will Need

• Paper

• Pencil with eraser

• Tape measure

• T-square

• Adjustable triangle

•  Architect scale

• 1/8-inch foam core (For ¼-inch scale model)

• Self-healing cutting mat

• Metal straightedge with cork backing

• Utility knife

• White glue

• Masking tape

Tip

Always cut at a 90-degree angle to make the edge of the foam core easier to glue to the base and adjacent pieces.

For a model with a nicer finish, consider using basswood.

Warning

Change blades often to maintain a sharp surface. It’s easier to cut the foam core and will help prevent accidental injuries.

RUBRIC FOR MODEL MAKING

 

REFLECTION: WHAT DID YOU LEARN?

1. Where did you have problems?

2. Were you able to solve the problem and how did you go about it if you did.

3.  Talk about what could be a better solution to the problem.

 THURSDAY: December 21, 2017

COMPUTER LAB:

COMPUTER LAB:

 

FRIDAY: December 22, 2017 

CLASSWORK LAB: 

Building the Model

1.Measure, mark and cut the foam core to the appropriate wall height for the first exterior wall using the straightedge, architect’s scale, utility knife and pencil with eraser.

2. Using the drafted floor plan on the base as a guide, mark off the appropriate length of the first exterior wall with the pencil. Remember to mark the location, width and height for any doors and windows.

3. Place the first foam core exterior wall on top of the cutting mat. Using the straightedge as a guide, cut the wall to length with the utility knife. Then, keeping the foam core wall on the cutting mat, follow the markings to cut out any windows and doors using the utility knife and straightedge.

4. Apply white glue to the edge of the first foam core exterior wall. Press firmly onto the base.

5. Using masking tape, secure the first wall by applying short strips at a 90-degree angle to the outside of the wall.

6. Continue Steps 1 through 4 for each wall, moving from one side of the model to the other, until the model is complete. Attach subsequent walls to each other with glue along the edges and apply masking tape to hold them in place.

7. Remove the masking tape after the glue dries and sets — about an hour.

Things You Will Need

• Paper

• Pencil with eraser

• Tape measure

• T-square

• Adjustable triangle

•  Architect scale

• 1/8-inch foam core (For ¼-inch scale model)

• Self-healing cutting mat

• Metal straightedge with cork backing

• Utility knife

• White glue

• Masking tape

Tip

Always cut at a 90-degree angle to make the edge of the foam core easier to glue to the base and adjacent pieces.

For a model with a nicer finish, consider using basswood.

Warning

Change blades often to maintain a sharp surface. It’s easier to cut the foam core and will help prevent accidental injuries.

REFLECTION: WHAT DID YOU LEARN?

1. Where did you have problems?

2. Were you able to solve the problem and how did you go about it if you did.

3.  Talk about what could be a better solution to the problem.

 

one_kings_lane_michael_smith_office_tour_011

MONDAY: December 11, 2017

CLASSROOM/COMPUTER LAB:

DESIGN THINKING IDEAS

Students will select a specific product (the brand) and write about it.  For example If it is a tennis shoe make it specific such as Nike, Air Jordan and model name.  First sketch the object and write about it in your sketchbook.

1. Sketch the image in your sketchbook

2. Describe the product

3. Talk about what you like about it

4. Talk about  the problems  you find with the product

5. Talk about what you  would do to improve it. After you have written this in your sketchbook write it in WORD and upload it to the website in the COMMENT section at the bottom of the page this week. 

CLASSWORK LAB: CONSTRUCTING A ROOM

CLASSROOM DEMO: MODEL MAKING

Building the Model

1.Measure, mark and cut the foam core to the appropriate wall height for the first exterior wall using the straightedge, architect’s scale, utility knife and pencil with eraser.

2. Using the drafted floor plan on the base as a guide, mark off the appropriate length of the first exterior wall with the pencil. Remember to mark the location, width and height for any doors and windows.

3. Place the first foam core exterior wall on top of the cutting mat. Using the straightedge as a guide, cut the wall to length with the utility knife. Then, keeping the foam core wall on the cutting mat, follow the markings to cut out any windows and doors using the utility knife and straightedge.

4. Apply white glue to the edge of the first foam core exterior wall. Press firmly onto the base.

5. Using masking tape, secure the first wall by applying short strips at a 90-degree angle to the outside of the wall.

6. Continue Steps 1 through 4 for each wall, moving from one side of the model to the other, until the model is complete. Attach subsequent walls to each other with glue along the edges and apply masking tape to hold them in place.

7. Remove the masking tape after the glue dries and sets — about an hour.

Things You Will Need

• Paper

• Pencil with eraser

• Tape measure

• T-square

• Adjustable triangle

•  Architect scale

• 1/8-inch foam core (For ¼-inch scale model)

• Self-healing cutting mat

• Metal straightedge with cork backing

• Utility knife

• White glue

• Masking tape

Tip

Always cut at a 90-degree angle to make the edge of the foam core easier to glue to the base and adjacent pieces.

For a model with a nicer finish, consider using basswood.

Warning

Change blades often to maintain a sharp surface. It’s easier to cut the foam core and will help prevent accidental injuries.

RUBRIC FOR MODEL MAKING

Transferring the Floor Plan

1. Decide what scale you will build the model: 1/4 inch (1/4-inch scale means that on your model, 1/4 inch equals 1 foot), 1/8 inch or 1/16 inch.

2. Calculate the total dimensions of the model, based on scale. For instance, if you are building a model that is 40 by 30 feet at 1/4-inch scale, your model will be 10 by 7 1/2 inches. Your base should be about 12 by 9 1/2 inches or larger, leaving a 2-inch edge around the model.

3. Place the foam core on top of the cutting mat. Measure and mark the appropriate size shape for the base on the foam core using the T-square, adjustable triangle, architect scale and pencil with eraser. Place the straightedge along the area to be cut, and, using the utility knife, cut the base to size.

4. Draft a floor plan of the sketch dimensions onto the foam core base using the same materials. Include all door openings, hallways and windows. Remember to add a width for the walls. Six-inch-thick walls should be sufficient on the floor plan in most cases.

REFLECTION: WHAT DID YOU LEARN?

1. Where did you have problems?

2. Were you able to solve the problem and how did you go about it if you did.

3.  Talk about what could be a better solution to the problem.

TUESDAY: December 12, 2017

CLASSROOM/COMPUTER LAB:

DESIGN THINKING IDEAS

Students will select a specific product (the brand) and write about it.  For example If it is a tennis shoe make it specific such as Nike, Air Jordan and model name.  First sketch the object and write about it in your sketchbook.

1. Sketch the image in your sketchbook

2. Describe the product

3. Talk about what you like about it

4. Talk about  the problems  you find with the product

5. Talk about what you  would do to improve it. After you have written this in your sketchbook write it in WORD and upload it to the website in the COMMENT section at the bottom of the page this week. 

CLASSWO

Building the Model

1.Measure, mark and cut the foam core to the appropriate wall height for the first exterior wall using the straightedge, architect’s scale, utility knife and pencil with eraser.

2. Using the drafted floor plan on the base as a guide, mark off the appropriate length of the first exterior wall with the pencil. Remember to mark the location, width and height for any doors and windows.

3. Place the first foam core exterior wall on top of the cutting mat. Using the straightedge as a guide, cut the wall to length with the utility knife. Then, keeping the foam core wall on the cutting mat, follow the markings to cut out any windows and doors using the utility knife and straightedge.

4. Apply white glue to the edge of the first foam core exterior wall. Press firmly onto the base.

5. Using masking tape, secure the first wall by applying short strips at a 90-degree angle to the outside of the wall.

6. Continue Steps 1 through 4 for each wall, moving from one side of the model to the other, until the model is complete. Attach subsequent walls to each other with glue along the edges and apply masking tape to hold them in place.

7. Remove the masking tape after the glue dries and sets — about an hour.

Things You Will Need

• Paper

• Pencil with eraser

• Tape measure

• T-square

• Adjustable triangle

•  Architect scale

• 1/8-inch foam core (For ¼-inch scale model)

• Self-healing cutting mat

• Metal straightedge with cork backing

• Utility knife

• White glue

• Masking tape

Tip

Always cut at a 90-degree angle to make the edge of the foam core easier to glue to the base and adjacent pieces.

For a model with a nicer finish, consider using basswood.

Warning

Change blades often to maintain a sharp surface. It’s easier to cut the foam core and will help prevent accidental injuries.

RUBRIC FOR MODEL MAKING

Transferring the Floor Plan

1. Decide what scale you will build the model: 1/4 inch (1/4-inch scale means that on your model, 1/4 inch equals 1 foot), 1/8 inch or 1/16 inch.

2. Calculate the total dimensions of the model, based on scale. For instance, if you are building a model that is 40 by 30 feet at 1/4-inch scale, your model will be 10 by 7 1/2 inches. Your base should be about 12 by 9 1/2 inches or larger, leaving a 2-inch edge around the model.

3. Place the foam core on top of the cutting mat. Measure and mark the appropriate size shape for the base on the foam core using the T-square, adjustable triangle, architect scale and pencil with eraser. Place the straightedge along the area to be cut, and, using the utility knife, cut the base to size.

4. Draft a floor plan of the sketch dimensions onto the foam core base using the same materials. Include all door openings, hallways and windows. Remember to add a width for the walls. Six-inch-thick walls should be sufficient on the floor plan in most cases.

REFLECTION: WHAT DID YOU LEARN?

1. Where did you have problems?

2. Were you able to solve the problem and how did you go about it if you did.

3.  Talk about what could be a better solution to the problem.

 WEDNESDAY: December 13, 2017

CLASSROOM : MODEL MAKING

Building the Model

1.Measure, mark and cut the foam core to the appropriate wall height for the first exterior wall using the straightedge, architect’s scale, utility knife and pencil with eraser.

2. Using the drafted floor plan on the base as a guide, mark off the appropriate length of the first exterior wall with the pencil. Remember to mark the location, width and height for any doors and windows.

3. Place the first foam core exterior wall on top of the cutting mat. Using the straightedge as a guide, cut the wall to length with the utility knife. Then, keeping the foam core wall on the cutting mat, follow the markings to cut out any windows and doors using the utility knife and straightedge.

4. Apply white glue to the edge of the first foam core exterior wall. Press firmly onto the base.

5. Using masking tape, secure the first wall by applying short strips at a 90-degree angle to the outside of the wall.

6. Continue Steps 1 through 4 for each wall, moving from one side of the model to the other, until the model is complete. Attach subsequent walls to each other with glue along the edges and apply masking tape to hold them in place.

7. Remove the masking tape after the glue dries and sets — about an hour.

Things You Will Need

• Paper

• Pencil with eraser

• Tape measure

• T-square

• Adjustable triangle

•  Architect scale

• 1/8-inch foam core (For ¼-inch scale model)

• Self-healing cutting mat

• Metal straightedge with cork backing

• Utility knife

• White glue

• Masking tape

Tip

Always cut at a 90-degree angle to make the edge of the foam core easier to glue to the base and adjacent pieces.

For a model with a nicer finish, consider using basswood.

Warning

Change blades often to maintain a sharp surface. It’s easier to cut the foam core and will help prevent accidental injuries.

RUBRIC FOR MODEL MAKING

 

REFLECTION: WHAT DID YOU LEARN?

1. Where did you have problems?

2. Were you able to solve the problem and how did you go about it if you did.

3.  Talk about what could be a better solution to the problem.

 THURSDAY: December 14, 2017

CLASSROOM: MODEL MAKING

Building the Model

1.Measure, mark and cut the foam core to the appropriate wall height for the first exterior wall using the straightedge, architect’s scale, utility knife and pencil with eraser.

2. Using the drafted floor plan on the base as a guide, mark off the appropriate length of the first exterior wall with the pencil. Remember to mark the location, width and height for any doors and windows.

3. Place the first foam core exterior wall on top of the cutting mat. Using the straightedge as a guide, cut the wall to length with the utility knife. Then, keeping the foam core wall on the cutting mat, follow the markings to cut out any windows and doors using the utility knife and straightedge.

4. Apply white glue to the edge of the first foam core exterior wall. Press firmly onto the base.

5. Using masking tape, secure the first wall by applying short strips at a 90-degree angle to the outside of the wall.

6. Continue Steps 1 through 4 for each wall, moving from one side of the model to the other, until the model is complete. Attach subsequent walls to each other with glue along the edges and apply masking tape to hold them in place.

7. Remove the masking tape after the glue dries and sets — about an hour.

Things You Will Need

• Paper

• Pencil with eraser

• Tape measure

• T-square

• Adjustable triangle

•  Architect scale

• 1/8-inch foam core (For ¼-inch scale model)

• Self-healing cutting mat

• Metal straightedge with cork backing

• Utility knife

• White glue

• Masking tape

Tip

Always cut at a 90-degree angle to make the edge of the foam core easier to glue to the base and adjacent pieces.

For a model with a nicer finish, consider using basswood.

Warning

Change blades often to maintain a sharp surface. It’s easier to cut the foam core and will help prevent accidental injuries.

RUBRIC FOR MODEL MAKING

REFLECTION: WHAT DID YOU LEARN?

1. Where did you have problems?

2. Were you able to solve the problem and how did you go about it if you did.

3.  Talk about what could be a better solution to the problem.

FRIDAY: December 15, 2017 

CLASSWORK LAB: 

Building the Model

1.Measure, mark and cut the foam core to the appropriate wall height for the first exterior wall using the straightedge, architect’s scale, utility knife and pencil with eraser.

2. Using the drafted floor plan on the base as a guide, mark off the appropriate length of the first exterior wall with the pencil. Remember to mark the location, width and height for any doors and windows.

3. Place the first foam core exterior wall on top of the cutting mat. Using the straightedge as a guide, cut the wall to length with the utility knife. Then, keeping the foam core wall on the cutting mat, follow the markings to cut out any windows and doors using the utility knife and straightedge.

4. Apply white glue to the edge of the first foam core exterior wall. Press firmly onto the base.

5. Using masking tape, secure the first wall by applying short strips at a 90-degree angle to the outside of the wall.

6. Continue Steps 1 through 4 for each wall, moving from one side of the model to the other, until the model is complete. Attach subsequent walls to each other with glue along the edges and apply masking tape to hold them in place.

7. Remove the masking tape after the glue dries and sets — about an hour.

Things You Will Need

• Paper

• Pencil with eraser

• Tape measure

• T-square

• Adjustable triangle

•  Architect scale

• 1/8-inch foam core (For ¼-inch scale model)

• Self-healing cutting mat

• Metal straightedge with cork backing

• Utility knife

• White glue

• Masking tape

Tip

Always cut at a 90-degree angle to make the edge of the foam core easier to glue to the base and adjacent pieces.

For a model with a nicer finish, consider using basswood.

Warning

Change blades often to maintain a sharp surface. It’s easier to cut the foam core and will help prevent accidental injuries.

REFLECTION: WHAT DID YOU LEARN?

1. Where did you have problems?

2. Were you able to solve the problem and how did you go about it if you did.

3.  Talk about what could be a better solution to the problem.

 

How to Create a Tunisian-Inspired Motif in Adobe Illustrator

by
Difficulty:IntermediateLength:LongLanguages:
Final product image

What You’ll Be Creating

If you plan to travel to Tunisia, make a half-day stop in the ceramic capital, Nabeul. Your eyes will be dancing around from the vibrant display of handmade color ceramics, glazed bowls, jugs, plates, tiles and all kinds of appealing pottery objects, spilling onto the streets and sidewalks and displayed in the town’s courtyard of shops.

These pottery and ceramic gems are the ancient tradition of Tunisian master craftsmen.

In this tutorial, you will use Adobe Illustrator to design a Tunisian-inspired motif. We will use basic Illustrator tools, as well as tools like the Live Paint Tool and Symbols Tool. Plus you will learn some tips and tricks to speed up your workflow. After completing the design, we will upload it to customize our very own throw pillows and cushions.

If you would like to expand your knowledge of geometric patterns, we have a series dedicated to Geometric Pattern Design tutorials.

You can find many Tunisian graphics over on GraphicRiver, including many helpful maps for your design and infographic needs.

Now, let’s start to create our motif!

Open Adobe Illustrator up and create a New Document (File > New or Control-N) using the following settings:

Select Print. 

Preset Details: Tunisian_Motif

  • Number of Artboards: 1
  • Width: 1500 px
  • Height: 1500 px
  • Units: Pixels
  • Color Mode: CMYK

And Create.

We are now ready to design our motif.

Create New Document Tunisian Motif Pixels

In order to create a geometrical correct design, it would be a good start to turn on the Smart Guides (Command-U or View > Smart Guides).

Now let’s begin by drawing a 17-segment geometric flower, by first creating a single petal frame.

Select the Ellipse Tool (L) from the Tools bar. Set null Fill and a Stroke of 15 pt (set from the top dock).

To precisely create the ellipse, use the Ellipse dialog box by clicking once on the artboard. The dialog box opens up.

Set the Width and Height at 500 px.

ellipse dialog box set width height pixels

Next, with the ellipse selected, Copy (Command-C) and Paste in Front (Command-F), to create the same ellipse on top of the original.

Afterwards, Move the selection (Object > Transform > Move Transform or use the Command-Shift-M shortcut) to apply a Horizontal Distance of 99 px.

Object transform Move horizontal distance 99px

To create the petal shape, we need to cut out the intersecting part of the ellipses.

Open the Pathfinder panel: Window > Pathfinder. Select Shape Modes: Intersect.

pathfinder panel shape mode intersect shape

Take the Direct Selection Tool (A) from the Tools bar, and select the left and right anchor points. To design the base of the petal, Command-Shift-M to Move the anchor points by 45 px Vertical.

move command anchor pints vertical px

Next, let’s center the base of the petal to our artboard.

Turn on Snap to Point: View > Snap to Point, so the selection snaps to the artboard center.

Use the Selection Tool (V) to select the shape and snap it to the point marked center, highlighted in red by the Smart Guides.

Sanp to point Selection tool Smart guides

Select the Rotate Tool (R), and hold down Alt key to fix the Rotate Axis Point center at the base of the petal. This will open the Rotate dialog box.

To calculate the radius you need for the 17 segments, divide 360° by 17, and you’ll get 21.18°. So set the Rotate Angle at 21.18° (counterclockwise) or –21.18° to go clockwise.

Select Copy to make a duplicate of the petal.

set rotate angle degrees clockwise copy

Transform Again by using the shortcut Command-D, to repeat the rest of the petal rotations.

Command-G to Group them all together. File > Save (Command-S).

Duplicate Copy action petal degrees paste

Now let’s draw some ellipses around our pattern. Take the Ellipse Tool (L) and select a white Fill and no Stroke.

Follow the Smart Guides and draw a 65 px Width & Height ellipse in the center of the motif. Then, draw an ellipse of 25 px with a black Fill and null Stroke in the center of the motif.

Ellipse Tool Fill Stroke Color center artboard

Now we’ve created a 500 px radius petal, so the circumference of our flower should be twice that number for the diameter. With the Ellipse Tool (L), create a circle with a Width & Height set at 1000 px, null Fill, and black Stroke of 15 pt. Center it using the Smart Guides.

If you want to make sure your object is centered to the artboard, open the Align panel (Window > Align). Simply select the object and choose Align to Artboard, from the Align Options dialog box. And then select Horizontal & Vertical Align Center.

align to artboard objects panel ellipse tool center

Next, we will offset ellipses around the motif. With the outer ellipse selected, Object > Path > Offset Path, and Offset: 20 px. Then set its Stroke at 10 pt. Then repeat Object > Path > Offset Path, and Offset  65 px.

object path offset ellipse pixels set stroke

With the newly created path selected, let’s repeat the offset with Object > Path > Offset Path, and Offset at 20 px. Set its Stroke at 15 pt.

I’ve decided to scale up the artwork slightly to fit within the frame. Object > Transform > Scale. Set at a Uniform 115%, and OK.

object transform scale uniform percentage preview

Next, let’s fill the spaces in the corners by creating a leaf-like pattern with the Arc Tool.

Click and hold the Line Segment Tool (\) to select the Arc Tool. Then click once on the artboard to set the curvature settings in the Arc Segment Tool Options dialog box as:

  • Length X-Axis: 129 px
  • Click where you want the arc to begin on the square reference point locator to determine the point from which the arc is drawn.
  • Length Y-Axis: 222 px
  • Type: Open
  • Slope: Convex 77
  • OK
arc tool segment options setting curvature

Use the Smart Guides to draw an arc from the top intersect point to the ellipse intersect point, and another arc from the ellipse intersect point to the top leaf anchor point.

arc center point intersect draw leaf

Select the Direct Selection Tool (A) from the Tools bar, and select the top anchor point, to Join paths by Object > Path > Join (Command-J).

Then repeat the leaf creations by drawing one intersecting the bottom left and top right of the base leaf. Follow the intersect points highlighted by the Smart Guides to align the paths properly.

Afterwards, select the top anchor points of each leaf, using the Direct Selection Tool (A), and Join paths (Command-J).

draw arc smart guides join paths

Group the leaf pattern together by hitting Command-G.

Select the Rotate Tool (R), and set the Rotate Axis Point at the center of the motif. Shift‑Alt-Drag to copy and constrain the angle by 45°. As you drag, the axis of the reflection rotates and will snap to the angle and release. Repeat to fill the other edges.

File > Save (Command-S).

rotate tool snap to point reflect 45 degree angle

Now that our pattern is basically set, we can add in some details

Select the first ellipse surrounding the center motif, and Object > Path > Offset Path, to Offset at 36 px, andOK.

Then open the Stroke panel (Window > Stroke), and set the Stroke Weight at 66 pt, select Dashed Line, and set dash-gap-dash-gap at 10pt-10pt-10pt-90pt, to create a double-dash pattern around. Make sure you select the Preserve Exact Dash and Gaps Length icon from the options.

offset path set stroke weight dashed line dasg gap pattern

Next, we will create a small pattern within the floral motif.

Select the Ellipse Tool (L), and with a black Fill, null Stroke, draw a single ellipse with a  Width 23 pxand Height 62 px.

Next, draw two smaller ellipses with Width 15 px and Height 15 px on both sides of the single ellipse. Align them all properly by following the Smart Guides.

Then, select the Anchor Point Tool (Shift-C), and taper the ends of the middle ellipse as shown below.

And Group (Command-G) all three objects together.

ellipse tool pattern create anchor point tool taper

Using the Direct Selection Tool (A), select the group of circles and drag vertically down to the next rectangular gap, while holding down the ShiftAlt keys to constrain movement and copy the group.

Afterwards, manually Scale down the group, from the bounding box, while holding down the ShiftAlt keys.

Then repeat by duplicating the second group and moving it vertically down to the third rectangular gap, and use the bounding to scale down slightly, while holding down the ShiftAlt keys.

Your motif should look similar to this.

direct selection tool pattern create ellipse copy paste scale

Group (Command-G) the three objects together.

Select the Rotate Tool (R). Hold down the Alt key to fix the Rotate Axis Point on the center of the motif. This will open the Rotate dialog box. Set the Rotate Angle at –21.18° to go clockwise, and select Copy.

Transform Again (Command-D) to copy the rest of the 17 segments.

Next, we will add a circular pattern between our dashed lines.

Take the Ellipse Tool (L) with a black Fill, Stroke to null, and draw a 23 px circle inside the center dash line.

Then, draw another circle with black Stroke, null Fill, around the first.

In the Stroke panel, select the settings as:

  • Weight: 11 pt
  • Cap: Round Cap
  • Corner: Round Join
  • Select Dashed Line, and set Dash: 0 pt and Gap: 25 pt
  • Select the Align Dashes to Corners and Path Ends icon

This will create dots around our circle.

stroke wweight adjust setting create dots

Group (Command-G) the circle with the dotted path.

Select the Rotate Tool (R). Set the Rotate Axis Point in the center of the motif, by holding down the Alt key to open the Rotate dialog box. Set the Rotate Angle at –11.18° to go clockwise, and select Copy.

Transform Again (Command-D), until you fill all the spaces around the dashed line.

Take the Direct Selection Tool (A), and select the third ellipse around the motif.

Object > Path > Offset Path, and Offset at 10 px.

From the Stroke panel, set the stroke settings of the new path as:

  • Weight: 10 pt
  • Cap: Round Cap
  • Corner: Round Join
  • Select Dashed Line, and set Dash: 0 pt and Gap: 40 pt
  • Select the icon Preserve Exact Dash and Gaps Length.

File > Save (Command-S).

Let’s color!

Start with the strokes. To move faster, select one stroke, hit Select > Same > Stroke Weight, and it will select all strokes of the same weight.

Apply the stroke color. I started with these hex colors:

  • Sea Blue #23255a
  • Aqua-Blue #1b82bc
  • Sky Blue #27aae1
  • Aqua Green #20baae
  • Green #009e8f
color hex selection same stroke weight

Next, we need to upload our color swatches, and to do that you open the Swatches panel (Window > Swatches). From the panel, click the New Swatch button or select New Swatch from the menu.

I’ve uploaded a couple colors, to experiment with what works best.

swatches panel new swatch color menu

Let’s apply color to our shapes.

Using the Selection Tool (V), select the floral motif. Next, click on the Live Paint Bucket Tool (K), which is hidden under the Shape Builder Tool (Shift-M), and click on the selection. This turns the selected object into a Live Paint Group.

So, when you move the Live Paint Bucket Tool (K) over them, the different sections that are ready to be painted become highlighted. The tool basically allows you to fill the gaps and shapes.

Now try it, filling different colors in different areas.

live paint bucket tool color shape builder

Take the Selection Tool (V) and select all three groups we created for the floral pattern, and Ungroup (Shift-Command-G) it twice from its group.

Use the Selection Tool (V) to select the shapes of similar size, Group together by Command-G, and apply a color Fill from the Swatches panel of your choice.

direct selection tool fill swatches

Use the Direct Selection Tool (V) to select the black circle encircled with a dotted path. Select each one and apply different Swatch Fills for each.

direct selection tool color swatch fills

Let’s create a background for our motif.

Select the Rectangle Tool (M), click once on the artboard, and the Rectangle dialog box will open. Set the Width and Height at 1500 px, and give the selection a dark blue color tone.

Center it from the Align panel, by choosing Align to Artboard from the Align Options dialog box. And then select Horizontal & Vertical Align Center.

Object > Arrange > Send to Back (Shift-Command-[).

rectangle tool background align to artboard arrange send to back

Select all the strokes with the Selection Tool (V).

Object > Expand Appearance. Then, Object > Expand… to open the Expand dialog box. Check all Object, Fill and Stroke, then OK.

Then Object >Expand… again, but this time, check Fill and Stroke, then OK, so that the group strokes can also be expanded.

Now all strokes are shapes.

object expand appearance dialog box create shapes

With the expanded shapes still selected, let’s apply color to our gaps.

Select the Live Paint Bucket Tool (K), to turn the selected objects into a Live Paint Group. Then hover over the different sections that become highlighted, and paint them the color of your choice.

Live paint bucket tool color swatches

For the last bit, let’s apply a Symbol to the artwork, so that we can add instances of that symbol multiple times into the background of the artwork without actually adding the art group multiple times.

Open the Symbols panel, Window > Symbols.

Select one of the circles with a surrounding dotted line group. Copy (Command-C), and then Paste(Command-P) to create a copy, and scale it slightly down from the bounding box by holding the Shift key to constrain proportions.

Click the New Symbol button in the Symbols panel menu, or drag the artwork into that panel. By default, the selected group becomes an instance of the new symbol.

In the Symbol Options dialog box:

  • Select Symbol Export Type: Graphic
  • Symbol Type: Static Symbol
  • OK
create new symbol panel menu copy paste

To place our instance, select its thumbnail from the Symbols panel and then choose the Symbol SprayerTool (Shift-S) to add random instances around the background.

Use the Symbol Shifter Tool, which is under the Symbol Sprayer Tool menu, if you need to shift the instances’ direction.

symbol sprayer tool shifter instances

We are almost done. Go back to your design and adjust color and tweak your instances. Now need to Export the file (File > Export As), with the settings:

  • Format: JPG
  • Check Use Artboards
  • Export

Set the JPEG Options dialog box:

  • Color Mode: CMYK
  • Quality: Maximum
  • Resolution: High (300ppi)
  • OK
JPEG Options use artboards export resolution high
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Great! Once you have exported your files, you can go to Redbubble, Society6, Vistaprint, Zazzle or any similar custom design websites and upload your files to create your pillows!

tunisian inspired motif design pattern misschatz upload

Our Tunisian motif is done and ready for applying on merchandise. Wonderful job!

You can use your imagination, add more symbols and details, or create more complex patterns by studying geometric design.

I hope you enjoyed this creative process and learned some new tips and tricks that you can use to create more motifs in the future.

Feel free to share your results in the comments below!

final tunisian motif pattern pillow cushion design

How to Draw Christmas Presents in the Snow in Adobe Illustrator

by
Difficulty:BeginnerLength:ShortLanguages:
Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In this tutorial you will learn how to use the Mesh Tool in Adobe Illustrator to create a vector Christmas background with a pile of gift boxes!

If you want to skip the tutorial and just use these presents along with some other awesome elements in your work, you can purchase Christmas Gift Boxes in Snow from GraphicRiver!

source image
Christmas Gift Boxes in Snow

For our very first step, grab a red (#B33029) rectangle.

Proceed to Effects > Warp > Arc and apply the effect with the following settings:

  • Bend -28%
  • Horizontal 0%
  • Vertical 0%
bend the rectangle

Go to Object > Expand Appearance, and modify the shape by bringing its edges up a bit.

Let’s begin using Mesh! Grab the Mesh Tool (U) and create a Mesh Grid like the one in the screenshot below by clicking where the nodes are supposed to be.

Once your Mesh Grid is done, begin coloring it by selecting the indicated column of nodes with the Mesh Tool (U) and changing their color to #F9E5D5.

Continue by coloring the nodes selected in the screenshot below with #D04640.

Finally, color the six nodes on the left edge of the shape with #941F17.

apply mesh

Draw the lid of the box using the same technique and these colors:

  1. #D24741
  2. #D45458
  3. #FFE0D0
color the lid with mesh

Create the bottom side of the gift box using the Mesh Tool and the following colors:

  1. #B12E27
  2. #FFEFDE
  3. #DD544E
  4. #941F17
  5. #EF8A7E
color the side with mesh

Assemble the box out of the three parts we made!

assemble the box

Let’s move on to creating the bow!

Create the first element with Mesh and these colors:

  1. #AE2C26
  2. #871910
  3. #3E0600
draw one part of bow

Create the second element.

  1. #8F1D15
  2. #FAB7A8
  3. #721107
  4. #150100
draw second part

Put both elements together to create the first piece of the bow.

join bow

Create another bottom part of the bow with Mesh.

  1. #AB2C25
  2. #7A150B
  3. #120100
use mesh to draw

Create the accompanying top part.

  1. #A0241E
  2. #D74F48
  3. #FADCCC
  4. #80170D
  5. #190200
draw more ribbon

Again, put the last two parts together.

put together bow part

Draw the first half of piece number 3.

  1. #B9352E
  2. #FFF7E6
draw mesh bow

Draw another part.

  1. #C13C36
  2. #480700
color mesh bow

Put together the third piece.

add mesh together

Draw another part of the bow.

  1. #C7413B
  2. #691108
color mesh bow

Draw this part out of two shapes, both colored with #C7413B.

  1. #C7413B
  2. #FFF7E6
  3. #4F0800
draw with mesh

Join our final two parts together!

join final two parts of the bow

Now put together the left half of the bow, as indicated by the numbers.

add four parts together

Go to Object > Transform > Reflect, choose the Vertical option, and press Copy to complete the bow.

create full bow

Draw a #100000 filled ellipse to serve as a shadow for the base of the bow.

draw black shadow

Place it onto the base.

add shadow

Add the bow on top of the gift box we drew earlier.

add bow

Draw an ellipse filled with a Radial Gradient (#58342D to white) to create another shadow. Use the Multiply transparency mode.

draw shadow

Add shadows on the base of the bow and under the box.

place two shadows

Let’s create a new color variant of this box!

Proceed to Edit > Edit Colors > Convert to Greyscale.

convert to grayscale

Go to Edit > Edit Colors > Adjust Colors and tweak the Black in the box by -14%.

change color

Finally, return to Edit > Edit Colors > Adjust Colors, only now choosing the RGB mode.

Tick Convert on the top of the window, and set the following parameters:

  • Red: -33%
  • Green: -9%
  • Blue: -9%
color to cyan

Draw the left side of the second gift box’s lid with Mesh.

  1. #D3CFB4
  2. #ABA485
  3. #817756
  4. #F7F5DF
draw side of box with mesh

Draw the right part of the lid.

  1. #E8E5CD
  2. #C5BFA4
  3. #F7F5DF
draw another side

Draw the left side of the box.

  1. #9E9676
  2. #695F3E
  3. #796F4D
  4. #E8E3CD
bottom of box with mesh

Draw the right side of the box.

  1. #CDC8AC
  2. #695F3E
  3. #796F4D
  4. #E8E3CD
side of box

Draw the lid.

  1. #F2F1DB
  2. #CFCAB0
  3. #E9E6CF
draw the lid using gradient mesh

Put together the second box.

assemble the gift box

Recolor a copy of the box with Edit > Edit Colors > Adjust Colors and these settings:

  • Red: -60%
  • Green: -37%
  • Blue: -12%
recolor the christmas present

Create another green box out of a copy with Edit > Edit Colors > Adjust Colors:

  • Red: -45%
  • Green: -36%
  • Blue: -34%
color the box green

Begin drawing the cyan bow.

  1. #3B7F92
  2. #9DD9CA
  3. #113C33
  4. #236072
draw cyan bow

Draw the second element.

  1. #3B7F92
  2. #A0DBCD
  3. #0E3533
  4. #489397
  5. #285F64
draw another bow part

Draw the next part.

  1. #1A4F63
  2. #05210B
draw another part

Create the next element.

  1. #1E556C
  2. #89CDC4
  3. #27678B
  4. #154549
  5. #53A1AD
draw mesh bow part
  1. #1D5268
  2. #7FC4BE
  3. #28698C
  4. #112F3F
Draw mesh ribbon

Draw the final part of the bow.

  1. #28667A
  2. #5299A7
  3. #0D3A3F
  4. #66B9C4
mesh final piece

Create a shadow for the bow by filling an ellipse with a #0B3330 to white Radial Gradient and Multiply transparency.

add shadow

Add all the parts together.

assemble bow

Let’s begin drawing the ribbon for the bow!

  1. #286372
  2. #79C5CD
  3. #61A9B6
  4. #0F2A30
draw cyan ribbon

Draw the top part of the ribbon.

  1. #3C8395
  2. #153538
  3. #59A3B0
draw mesh ribbon

Join these two together!

bring together ribbon

Create another element.

  1. #2C6779
  2. #144349
  3. #5EAABA
  4. #93D8DB
draw another mesh

Draw the last section of the ribbon.

  1. #5EAABA
  2. #16454C
last mesh piece

Draw a pattern for the box.

Use two circles with a #408696 Stroke, which you would then Expand. Create a couple of different versions.

pattern

Create a rectangular pattern out of the circles.

create pattern

Create two copies of the pattern.

Go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Free Distort and create a pattern for the side of the box.

free discort

Grab the second copy and through Effect > Distort & Transform > Free Distort, create a pattern for the lid.

free discort

Apply the pattern and the bow with the ribbon to the box.

add pattern to box

Grab a copy of the pattern, and set it to Multiply and 60% Opacity before applying it to the blue box.

recolor

Take another pattern, this time with Screen and 60% Opacity, for the green box.

recolor

Recolor the bow and the pattern with Edit > Edit Colors > Adjust Colors:

  • Red: 45%
  • Green: -47%
  • Blue: -41%
change bow to red

Arrange the boxes we made into a pile.

create group of presents

Begin drawing the third box.

  1. #778C80
  2. #B6CCBC
  3. #363E2A
  4. #353C28
  5. #5B6B5B
side of the box

Draw the lid.

  1. #B2CDBF
  2. #FEF9E7
  3. #95B0A7
lid with mesh

Draw the side of the lid.

  1. #8EA59B
  2. #EDEFDE
  3. #708477
  4. #A1BCB3
  5. #515F4F
side of the lid with mesh

Assemble the gift box.

put together present

Begin drawing a bow.

  1. #90A29A
  2. #102114
  3. #C8D8C2
  4. #637568
bow part

Draw the second part.

  1. #55675F
  2. #DBEAD4
  3. #798E87
  4. #D4352C
mesh piece

Draw another element with mesh.

  1. #95A79F
  2. #ECFCDF
  3. #091B0F
3rd bow part
  1. #8FA299
  2. #516156
  3. #CDDECD
draw with mesh
  1. #A7BAB3
  2. #E9FCDD
  3. #75867C
  4. #112216
another part of bow
  1. #112317
  2. #53655C
mesh part of bow
  1. #7C9884
  2. #E5EDE3
  3. #224029
7th mesh part

Draw the eighth element:

  1. #223B29
  2. #46614F

and the final part.

  1. #37513E
  2. #0E2312
  3. #893398
two final parts

Assemble the bow!

put together bow

Place the bow onto the box.

place bow

Recolor a copy of the present into blue by using Edit > Edit Colors > Adjust Colors:

  • Red: -18%
  • Green: -7%
  • Blue: 15%
recolor box

Apply Edit > Edit Colors > Saturate with -35% Intensity to get a light blue box.

desaturate box

Add these boxes and the boxes made in the first section to the group.

create group

Draw the background with Mesh:

  1. #6C9F99
  2. #C4D7CA
  3. #99C0B8
  4. #D7E2D2
  5. #3F7D79
color background with mesh

Add a drawing of snow.

  1. #EFF4E4
  2. #D1E0D5
draw mesh snow

Combine the two.

add snow

Place the group of presents on the snow.

Next, draw a rectangle and put it on top of the image. The rectangle should “frame” everything you want to keep in the picture.

Select all the elements, right-click, and choose Make Clipping Mask.

clipping mask

To create some falling snow, refer to my older Christmas tutorial! Give it 60% Opacity.

add snow from older tutorial
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Our picture is finished!

final picture

What now? You can try any of my other tutorials from my profile, or check out my portfolio on GraphicRiver, as well as the original vector we recreated in this tutorial.

I hope you enjoyed the tutorial, and I would be super happy to see any results in the comments below!source picture

 

MONDAY, December 11, 2017

 

CLASSROOM:  CREATE A PAGE

PORTFOLIO

Based on your plan for your portfolio start developing your pages each day.  You start with a reasonable goal that you can complete in one afternoon and then execute it by the end of the period.

WRITE YOUR GOAL/REFLECTION FOR TODAY:  

GOAL

Each day you need to write a goal that will be worth 30 points.  You need to have a minimal of 3 sentences using the following questions.

1. What  are you going to work on today?

2. What steps will you take to  get there?

3.  What will I see at the end of the day?

REFLECTION:

• 3 things you learned today?

• If you were not able to reach your goal,  what prevented you from completing your goal?

TUESDAY, December 12, 2017 

CLASSROOM:  CREATE A PAGE

PORTFOLIO

Based on your plan for your portfolio start developing your pages each day.  You start with a reasonable goal that you can complete in one afternoon and then execute it by the end of the period.

WRITE YOUR GOAL/REFLECTION FOR TODAY:  

GOAL

Each day you need to write a goal that will be worth 30 points.  You need to have a minimal of 3 sentences using the following questions.

1. What  are you going to work on today?

2. What steps will you take to  get there?

3.  What will I see at the end of the day?

REFLECTION:

• 3 things you learned today?

• If you were not able to reach your goal,  what prevented you from completing your goal?

WEDNESDAY, December 13, 2017 

CLASSROOM:  CREATE A PAGE

PORTFOLIO

Based on your plan for your portfolio start developing your pages each day.  You start with a reasonable goal that you can complete in one afternoon and then execute it by the end of the period.

WRITE YOUR GOAL/REFLECTION FOR TODAY:  

GOAL

Each day you need to write a goal that will be worth 30 points.  You need to have a minimal of 3 sentences using the following questions.

1. What  are you going to work on today?

2. What steps will you take to  get there?

3.  What will I see at the end of the day?

REFLECTION:

• 3 things you learned today?

• If you were not able to reach your goal,  what prevented you from completing your goal?

THURSDAY, December 14, 2017 

CLASSROOM:  CREATE A PAGE

PORTFOLIO

Based on your plan for your portfolio start developing your pages each day.  You start with a reasonable goal that you can complete in one afternoon and then execute it by the end of the period.

WRITE YOUR GOAL/REFLECTION FOR TODAY:  

GOAL

Each day you need to write a goal that will be worth 30 points.  You need to have a minimal of 3 sentences using the following questions.

1. What  are you going to work on today?

2. What steps will you take to  get there?

3.  What will I see at the end of the day?

REFLECTION:

• 3 things you learned today?

• If you were not able to reach your goal,  what prevented you from completing your goal?

FRIDAY, December 15, 2017 

CLASSROOM:  CREATE A PAGE

PORTFOLIO

Based on your plan for your portfolio start developing your pages each day.  You start with a reasonable goal that you can complete in one afternoon and then execute it by the end of the period.

WRITE YOUR GOAL/REFLECTION FOR TODAY:  

GOAL

Each day you need to write a goal that will be worth 30 points.  You need to have a minimal of 3 sentences using the following questions.

1. What  are you going to work on today?

2. What steps will you take to  get there?

3.  What will I see at the end of the day?

REFLECTION:

• 3 things you learned today?

• If you were not able to reach your goal,  what prevented you from completing your goal?

 

COMPUTER LAB:

How to Draw a Festive Winter Landscape With Glowing Lamps in Adobe Illustrator

by
Difficulty:BeginnerLength:ShortLanguages:
Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In this tutorial, you will learn how to use the Mesh Tool in Adobe Illustrator to create a vector evening winter background!

If you want to skip the tutorial and just use this background with some other awesome elements, purchase the Christmas Evening Winter Landscape from GraphicRiver!

Christmas Evening Winter Landscape
Christmas Evening Winter Landscape

Let’s begin by using Mesh for a bit!

Start by drawing a rectangle and filling it with #4B6471 color and create a Mesh grid for this shape by manually placing nodes with the Mesh Tool (U).

Once your Mesh grid is done, begin coloring it by selecting the bottom row of nodes and the bottom middle node and changing their color to #8A9BA2.

Continue this step by coloring the nodes on the top and on the sides with #253B4B and the middle nodes of the second row from the top with #385260.

Finish by changing the color of the bottom nodes to #D2DAD9.

draw mesh background

Let’s move on to drawing the snow hills!

Draw a #F6F7F2 rectangle, and then place some Mesh nodes with the Mesh Tool (U). Move said nodes to create a wavy shape out of the rectangle, trying to recreate the screenshot below.

Finally, color the selected nodes with #D0DFE4. The first hill is done!

mesh snow hill

Draw the second hill following the same instructions as before and using these colors:

  1. #E1EBEC
  2. #C0D1D8
  3. #F6F7F2
draw mesh snow

Finally, draw the third hill in a similar fashion.

  1. #CBD8DE
  2. #F4F6F1
draw snow hill

Place the hills on top of each other, with the first one being in the front and the third one being in the back.

Make them overlap to match the screenshot!

arrange hills

Place the hills on the bottom of the background!

place hills

Let’s move on to drawing the lamp.

Draw half an outline of it by using the Pen Tool (P), and then use Object > Transform > Reflect and click Copy to obtain the second half. Move them close to each other for now.

draw half

Select the two halves and use Unite in the Pathfinder panel to create a united outline for the lamp.

reflect the lamp

Using the Pen Tool (P) and some small ellipses (Ellipse Tool, L), draw the transparent surfaces of the lamp.

Lay the shapes on top of the outline, select all, and use Minus Front in the Pathfinder panel to “crop” them out.

crop out the lamp

Select the result and apply a Linear, #2A1800 to #DFCFD9 to #2A1800 Gradient to it.

gradient

Using the Pen Tool (P), draw a decorative swirl as can be seen below.

In the Stroke panel, change the Stroke Profile to the one below.

change stroke profile

Draw a little ellipse and add it to both ends of the curve.

Selecting the curve, go to Object > Expand Appearance, and then select all objects and Unite them in the Pathfinder panel. Change the result’s color to #453A2E.

finish curve

Attach the lamp to our decorative part.

add curve to lamp

Let’s draw the lamppost! Use Mesh, just as we learned before.

  1. #100804
  2. #7F7460
  3. #5A503E
draw lamppost with mesh

Draw the second part of the lamppost similarly.

  1. #100804
  2. #362C1B
  3. #796F5A
more mesh

Draw the base.

  1. #100804
  2. #665B48
  3. #3B2E22
base of post with mesh

Draw a #110600 rounded shape, and then bend it with Effect > Warp > Arc, using -20% Bend.

Go to Object > Expand Appearance.

warp object

Color the shape with Mesh.

  1. #413629
  2. #6F6452
  3. #54493A
mesh

Resize copies of the shape.

three copies

Put the post together and add the rings we just created.

join lamppost

Finally, attach the actual lamps to the top.

add lamps

Now that we’ve drawn the outline, it’s time to put lights in these lamps!

Begin by drawing a narrow ellipse and adding a Radial, #FFFF7F to #000000 Gradient to it.

draw ellipse

Put another copy of that ellipse on top and tweak the Transparency options, selecting Screen and 79% Opacity.

Create a copy of the result, rotate it, and make it smaller.

more ellipse

Draw a very narrow ellipse with the same Gradient as before.

another gradient ellipse

Add a copy on top, creating a cross. Change its Opacity to 61% and Transparency to Screen.

add one more

Draw a circle, using the same Radial Gradient. Again, use Screen, now with 95% Opacity.

gradient circle

Create a flare by placing all the elements on top of each other.

join flare

Draw a final ellipse for the light, using Screen and a Radial Gradient from #FFFFFF to #FFB500 to #000000.

gradient ellipse

Place the first flare behind the lamp outline and the final ellipse on top of it.

place light

Add the lights to both lamps.

both lamps

Create a few copies of the lamp for the upcoming landscape.

add copies

Let’s begin drawing the trees!

Learn how to draw the branch we will be copying in the second section of this tutorial. Now draw the trunk, fill it with #544E48, and start adding copies of the branch to it as shown below.

add branches to tree

Add more branches to complete the tree.

finish tree

Create a copy of the branches without the trunk and draw another one.

another tree

Add more branches to the second tree.

add more branches

Draw a highlight with a #FCFC98 to #000000 Radial Gradient, change the Opacity to 70% and Transparency to Screen.

gradient highlight

Create copies of the trees and add the highlights behind them.

copies of trees

Place the trees and the lamps onto the background.

add to background

Draw two identical circles. Fill one with #ACB99A and the second with a #020200 to white Radial Gradient.

Set both circles’ transparency to Screen.

two circles

Place the green circle under the gradient, and then select both and use Make Mask in the Transparency panel. Check both Clip and Invert Mask.

transparency mask

Add these highlights on top of the background.

add highlights

To add snow, refer to this tutorial.

add snow

Draw a rectangle on top of everything to “frame” all the content you want to be seen in the final picture.

draw outline

Select all elements and right-click, after that selecting Make Clipping Mask.

make clipping mask
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You’re done!

final picture

What now? You can try any of my other tutorials from my profile, or check out my portfolio on GraphicRiver, as well as the original vector we recreated in this tutorial.

I hope you enjoyed the tutorial, and I would be super happy to see any results in the comments below!

Christmas Evening Winter Landscape

How to Create Flat Profession Avatars in Adobe Illustrator

by
Difficulty:IntermediateLength:LongLanguages:
This post is part of a series called Learn Adobe Illustrator.
Create an Avocado With Only One Shape in Adobe Illustrator
Final product image

What You’ll Be Creating

In this tutorial we’ll be making a set of flat-style portraits, depicting people of different professions and occupations. Such images can be used as avatars for social networks or as design elements for your website, depicting various categories. Or you can even draw yourself, using such flat-style portraits for your business card.

The basic shapes and tools of Adobe Illustrator are great for creating flat vector graphics, and we’ll go through the full process, discovering new tips and tricks, using the Pathfinder panel, Clipping Masks and some other features and functions of Adobe Illustrator. You can follow this tutorial with ease even if you don’t use a graphics tablet. Let’s begin!

If you want to go further and make a larger set of professions or you need some other types of portraits, feel free to find your inspiration directly at Envato Market by browsing flat design avatars or flat design portraits. You can purchase this set, plus additional avatar options in my Flat Professions Avatars Set on GraphicRiver.

Icon set

We’ll start by making the head of our first character. Let’s take the Rectangle Tool (M) and make a 65 x 80 px shape of a light-pink skin tone. Keeping our shape selected, go to Object > Path > Add Anchor Points. You will notice additional anchor points appear in the middle of each side of the rectangle.

make a head from rectangle 1

Go to Object > Path > Add Anchor Points again, adding two more points for each side. As a matter of fact, we don’t need all of the created anchor points, so let’s delete the unwanted ones. Take the Direct Selection Tool (A) and select three points on the left side of the rectangle and three on the right. Head to the control panel on top and click the Remove selected anchor points button.

Now let’s shape the face. Select two extreme anchor points in the bottom corners of the rectangle and click Enter to open the Move window. Set the Horizontal value to 0 px and Vertical to -25 px to move the anchor points 25 px up, shaping the chin. Click OK.

make a head from rectangle 2

If you want to make the chin wider or narrower, select one of its anchor points and hit Enter again, opening the Move window and moving the point horizontally to the left or right. For example, move the right point to the left by setting the Horizontal value to -5 px and then move the left point to the right, setting the Horizontal value to 5 px. This way we’ve moved the points closer to each other.

Use the Live Corners feature to make the face a bit more smooth and rounded by selecting it with theDirect Selection Tool (A) and pulling any of the circle markers a bit closer to the center.

If you’re using older versions of Adobe Illustrator, which don’t have the Live Corners feature, that’s totally fine! You can get the same result if you go to Effect > Stylize > Round Corners. The only difference is that you can’t choose just one corner—it will make all the corners rounded. But you can always fix this with the Eraser Tool (Shift-E).

make the chin narrower

Let’s add the nose! Take the Rectangle Tool (M) and make a 9 x 20 px pink shape. Make the corners rounded or use the Rounded Rectangle Tool to create the entire shape.

Let’s make sure that the nose is perfectly aligned to the face. Select both the face and the nose with the Selection Tool (V), hold Alt and click the face. You will see a thick selection stroke around it, indicating that this is now the Key Object, which means that all other objects will be aligned to it. Now head to the Align panel and click Horizontal Align Center. Awesome! Now the nose is right in the center of the face.

make a rounded nose and align it

Let’s add a moustache. Make a brown rectangle of 30 x 10 px size, click it with the right mouse button and Arrange > Send Backward (Control-[), placing it beneath the nose.

make a mustache from rectangle 1

Select the upper left anchor point of the brown rectangle, hit Enter and set the Horizontal value to 10 pxand the Vertical value to 0 px in order to move the point closer to the nose. Repeat the same for the opposite side of the moustache, this time setting the Horizontal value to -10 px. Make the bottom part of the moustache slightly rounded with the Live Corners feature.

make a mustache from rectangle 2

Use the Rounded Rectangle Tool to make a small shape for the lower lip, placing it beneath the moustache (Control-[). Align the lip horizontally to the face using the Align panel.

add the lower lip with Rounded Rectangle Tool

Use the Ellipse Tool (L) to make an 8 x 8 px white circle for the eyeball and place a smaller (6 x 6 px) brown circle on top for the iris. Add a tiny white circle for the highlight and move both eyes to the proper position.

make the eye from circles

Let’s render a helmet, which protects the worker’s head. Make a 65 x 19 px orange rectangle on top of the head. Select the upper anchor points with the Direct Selection Tool (A) and pull the Live Corners markers down, making the cap rounded.

make a rounded helmet

Now let’s add the hair. Take the Rectangle Tool (M) and make a narrow vertical stripe at the left side of the face for the sideburn. Select the bottom right anchor point with the Direct Selection Tool (A) and make the corner rounded.

Keeping the sideburn selected, double-click the Reflect Tool (O) and flip the shape over the Vertical Axis. Click the copy button and stick the second sideburn to the right side of the face.

make side whiskers from rectangle

Let’s modify the bottom side of the helmet, so that we’ll be able to add a peak. Find the spot where the sideburn crosses the bottom line of the helmet, and use the Pen Tool (P) to make a new anchor point. Do the same for the right sideburn. You can turn on the Smart Guides (View > Smart Guides), which will mark the intersection point.

Finally, select both newly created anchor points with the Direct Selection Tool (A) and press Enter to open the Move window. Set the Horizontal value to 0 px and Vertical value to -5 px, moving the anchor points up.

add new anchor points and move them up

Now let’s add a peak to the helmet. Make a lighter-orange narrow rectangle and attach its upper anchor points to the helmet. Smart Guides (View > Smart Guides) can be really helpful at this step.

Select the bottom left anchor point and use the Move function to move it to the right by setting the Horizontal value to 10 px and Vertical value to 0 px. Repeat the same for the opposite bottom anchor point, but this time move it to the left. And finally, drag the bottom anchor points down a bit if you want to make the peak wider. Use the Live Corners feature to make the bottom corners slightly rounded.

make a peak from rectangle

Take the Rounded Rectangle Tool and make a narrow vertical shape of 7 x 30 px on top of the helmet. Align it to the helmet, using the helmet as the Key Object.

Add two shorter stripes on both sides of the first stripe, and let’s use the Align panel to make the gaps between the stripes even. Select the stripes and click Align to Selection in the Align panel. Then click Horizontal Distribute Center, and there you have it!

add details to the helmet

Take the Rounded Rectangle Tool, and this time let’s shape the ears. Make an 11 x 23 px pink shape at the left side of the head and Send it to Back (Shift-Control-[). Press Alt-Shift and drag the ear to the opposite side of the head, making a copy.

make the ears from rounded rectangle

Make a 35 x 40 px rectangle for the neck, filling it with a slightly darker skin tone in order to separate it from the face. Make the bottom part of the neck a bit rounded.

And let’s start designing the clothes of the worker. Make a 90 x 70 px dark-blue rectangle for the shirt. Add two more anchor points at the spots where the neck crosses the shirt. Move the side anchor points of the rectangle down, holding Shift and pressing the down arrow key several times in order to form the shoulders.

make a neck and a shirt from the rectangles

Let’s move on to the worker’s uniform and place two narrow orange stripes above the shoulders. Group (Control-G) them and align the group to the dark-blue shirt, using the shirt as the Key Object. Add a rectangle above the chest and Unite all the orange parts in Pathfinder, merging them into a single shape.

Go to Object > Path > Add Anchor Points, and then select the new point in the middle of the neck area of the uniform and drag it down, making a V shape.

make a uniform from rectangles

Use the Live Corners feature to make the corners of the uniform slightly rounded. Now we need to get rid of those pieces outside the shirt in order to make both shapes fit each other. Select both the shirt and the uniform and take the Shape Builder Tool (Shift-M). Hold down Alt and click the pieces outside the shirt which you need to delete. Add two lighter narrow stripes on both shoulders, depicting a reflective tape.

edit the uniform with the Shape Builder Tool

Let’s give our icon a trendy flat-style look by darkening one of its sides. Select all the elements of the character (Control-A), Copy them and Paste in Front (Control-C > Control-F). Click the Unite function in the Pathfinder panel to merge the parts into a single silhouette.

make a merged silhouette in pathfinder

Take the Line Segment Tool (\), hold Shift and make a vertical line across the silhouette. Select both the line and the silhouette and align them horizontally in the Align panel, using the silhouette as the Key Object.

Keeping both shapes selected, use the Divide function of Pathfinder to split the silhouette into two equal halves.

divide the shapes in the pathfinder

Delete the left half and switch the remaining half to Multiply Blending Mode in the Transparency panel to make it semi-transparent. You can adjust the color of the shadow, making it lighter or darker in the Colorpanel, or by changing its Opacity in the Transparency panel.

make a shadow in multiply mode

Oops, looks as if we forgot the eyebrows. Let’s go back to the face. Make a circle around the eye and set the Stroke color to dark brown in the Color panel. Take the Scissors Tool (C) and click the side anchor points to split the circle apart. Delete the lower part.

Head to the Stroke panel and increase the thickness of the brow by setting the Weight value to 2 pt. Switch the Cap and Corner to middle positions, making the shape rounded.

make a brow from a circle 1

Keeping the brow selected, take the Eraser Tool (Shift-E), hold Alt and drag the selection rectangle over the bottom part of the brow to erase the ends, making the arch a bit shorter.

Copy the shape, forming a second eyebrow.

make a brow from a circle 2

Select the upper side anchor points of the dark-blue shirt and use Live Corners to make the shoulders a bit smoother.

make the shoulders rounded

The main element of our first avatar is ready, so now we need to give it a completed look by forming a background. Use the Ellipse Tool (L) to make a 180 x 180 px circle. Fill it with bright turquoise color, copy it and Bring the copy to Front (Shift-Control-]).

Finally, select everything, click the right mouse button and Make Clipping Mask. Awesome! Now we have a tidy circle avatar!

You can still edit the image if you double-click it and enter Isolation Mode.

make a circle icon base and clipping mask

And the last stroke here will be a long, flat-style shadow! Take the Rectangle Tool (M) and make a large rectangle. Switch it to Multiply mode or lower the Opacity to make the shapes beneath it visible. Hold Shiftand rotate the shape 45 degrees.

Now you need to make the rectangle fit the silhouette of our worker. Stick its anchor points to the edges of the character. Make additional anchor points with the Pen Tool (P) and move them with the Direct Selection Tool (A), hiding the unneeded parts of the rectangle inside the man’s figure.

When you’re happy with the result, place the shadow inside the Clipping Mask, hiding it beneath the worker (use the Layers panel to drag the shape inside the Mask).

make a flat long shadow

Finally, apply a linear gradient from turquoise to white to the shadow and place it diagonally, using the Gradient Tool (G). Switch the shadow to Multiply mode, making it blend with the background.

And done! Our first profession avatar is ready! Let’s move to the next one!

apply a gradient to the shadow

Our next avatar will be a portrait of a surgeon with dark skin tone. We’ll be using the avatar of the worker as a base for the second portrait, so let’s duplicate it, right click and Release Clipping Mask.

Delete the helmet, moustache and the orange worker’s uniform, and recolor the icon base and shadow to yellow colors. Proceed with recoloring the elements, changing the color of the clothes to turquoise and the skin tone to a darker chocolate color. Change the color of the hair and eyebrows to darker brown as well.

recolor the base of the new avatar

Let’s add a medical hat to our surgeon. Use the Rectangle Tool (M) to make a 40 x 24 px rectangle. Move the upper side anchor points a bit closer to each other, using the arrow keys of your keyboard and making the top of the hat a bit narrower. Use the Live Corners feature to make the upper corners rounded.

make a surgeon hat

Let’s create a simple surgeon’s mask. Make a 33 x 20 px rectangle. Add a group of darker horizontal stripes above the mask, making it more detailed. And, finally, place a narrow string at the top of the mask and Send it to Back (Shift-Control-[).

make a surgeon mask

Now place the mask above the surgeon’s face and let’s hide the unneeded pieces. Duplicate the base of the face and Bring it to Front (Shift-Control-]), placing it above the mask (you may need to drag the copy outside the face group if you’ve grouped the face previously). Select both the face copy and the mask, right click and Make Clipping Mask.

Great! Now it fits the face perfectly.

add mask to the surgeon

Let’s finish up with the surgeon’s avatar by adding a final detail to his uniform. Use the Polygon Tool to make a triangle and rotate it, turning the shape upside down. Fill the shape with light-grey color. Select both the turquoise shirt and the white triangle and use the Shape Builder Tool (Shift-M) while holding Altto delete the pieces outside the body, forming a nice V-shaped neck-band.

Darken the right part of the character with the help of a semi-transparent shape in Multiply mode, and hide all parts inside a round Clipping Mask.

We’re ready to move on!

add elements to the uniform of the surgeon

Now it’s time to draw a flight attendant portrait! We won’t be making it from scratch, so let’s transform the first figure instead. Duplicate the worker’s icon and make the base for our future avatar by releasing theClipping Mask and deleting all the unneeded elements. Recolor the circle icon base to a gentle red color.

The shape of the face seems to be too angled for our new character, so let’s make a new one. Make a 40 x 55 px rectangle and use the Live Corners feature to make the corners fully rounded.

transform the face making it more female

Let’s make the nose shape thinner. Select the two side anchor points at the upper part of the nose and delete them using the Remove selected anchor points function in the upper control panel. This will make the upper part of the nose look more delicate.

delete the anchor points on the nose

Now let’s move on to the lips. Go to Object > Path > Add Anchor Points. Select the new anchor point in the middle of the upper lip and drag it down using the Direct Selection Tool (A). Use the Live Corners feature to make the shape of the lips more flowing and smooth. And split the lips apart, using the Scissors Tool (C) by clicking the side anchor points.

edit the lips making them feminine

Make the lips brighter, increasing the saturation of the pink color, and let’s make the shape slightly arched. Group (Control-G) both halves of the lips and go to Effect > Warp > Arch. Set the Horizontal Bend value to -30%. Click OK and Object > Expand Appearance to apply the effect, making the mouth smiling. You can also make the upper lip a bit darker in order to separate it from the lower lip, making the mouth more true to life.

make the lips arched and bright

We’re going to make our woman blonde, so let’s recolor her eyes and brows accordingly. We can also add a thin arched stroke for the eyelashes, making it the same way as we made the brows.

recolor her eyes and brows

Now let’s form a neat hairdo. Take the Ellipse Tool (L) and place two ellipses above the forehead, making them overlap. Unite the ellipses in the Pathfinder. Use the Shape Builder Tool (Shift-M) to delete the unneeded piece above the head, making the hair slick and tidy.

make the hair

In order to make the character look more subtle, let’s make the neck thinner and more rounded. And we can also modify the face a bit by making it thinner and adding a gentle round blush on the cheeks.

add details to the face

Now let’s render the uniform of our flight attendant! We’ll be using the dark-blue shirt base that we already have and just adding more distinctive details. Let’s turn the shirt into a stylish jacket.

Take the Rectangle Tool (M) and make a 33 x 45 px stripe. Rotate it to about 45 degrees and let’s make a cutout notch closer to its top. Place a tiny triangle, overlapping the main shape. Use the Shape Builder Tool (Shift-M) while holding down Alt to cut out the triangle.

Use the Reflect Tool (O) to make a mirrored copy of the created shape, forming a lapel. You can erase the unneeded pieces in the bottom part using the Eraser Tool (Shift-E) or the Shape Builder Tool (Shift-M) after you place it above the jacket.

make a lapel of the jacket from rectangles 

Form a collar of the white shirt, combining three triangles and making one of the corners of each shape slightly rounded.

make a collar from triangles

Now we need to render a small red tie, making a distinctive mark of the airlines. Start by making a small 8 x 7.5 px rectangle. Move its bottom anchor points closer to each other, using the arrow keys and making the bottom of the shape narrower. Make those bottom corners rounded, forming the knot of our tie.

Now take the Ellipse Tool (L), make a squashed shape and rotate it about 45 degrees. Select the bottom anchor point, head to the upper control panel and click the Convert selected anchor points to cornerbutton, making the shape pointed. Flip the copy of the shape to the opposite side, making the tie look complete.

make a red tie

Let’s move to the next element of the flight attendant’s uniform: the cap. Make an 18 x 18 px square of the same dark-blue color as the jacket. Rotate it 45 degrees and squash it a bit, making a diamond shape. Make the corners rounded with the Live Corners feature.

Make a darker blue stripe with rounded corners and attach it to the left side of the first shape. Use the Reflect Tool (O) to flip the copy of the shape horizontally, forming the folding of the cap.

make a stewardess cap

Shape a golden airlines emblem, depicting a winged medal from a 4 x 4 px circle, and a group of rounded rectangles for the feathers. Attach the emblem to the cap, aligning it to the center.

add the emblem to the cap

Finally, dress up our flight attendant and finish the icon by adding a gentle shadow and hiding everything with a round clipping mask.

dress up our stewardess and finish up with the icon

We’ll be using the base of our stewardess avatar, changing her skin tone to a nice chocolate color and the hair to dark brown. Let’s also switch the color of the icon base to bright green.

use the base of previous icon

Let’s flip the hair horizontally to make it differ from the previous avatar. And let’s form a short haircut. Make a 45 x 53 px rectangle of a darker brown color and place it beneath the head. Select the upper side anchor points and make the top of the shape fully rounded.

Now let’s depict separate hair locks in the bottom. Form a few tiny triangles and place them at the bottom of the hairdo, making the shapes overlap. Use the Shape Builder Tool (Shift-M), holding down Alt to cut out the triangles.

Add a simple V-shaped collar for our shirt, forming it from two narrow rectangles.

make a short haircut

Now let’s create the hat of our police officer. Use the Polygon Tool to make a 7-sided shape about 45 x 45 px size. Squash the shape and modify its bottom part by moving the anchor points farther from each other and making the corners a bit rounded. Move the bottom points of the shape up a bit, making the bottom side flat.

make a police officer hat

Add a narrow horizontal peak to the hat, using the Rectangle Tool (M) and making its bottom corners rounded.

Let’s make the peak glossy by adding a stylized highlight. Make two narrow stripes, rotate them 45 degrees and place them above the peak. Use the Shape Builder Tool (Shift-M) to delete the unwanted pieces outside the peak.

add a peak to the police officer hat

Let’s make the most important element of every police officer: the badge! Make a 10 x 13 px rectangle of a bright-yellow color. Go to Object > Path > Add Anchor Points. Select the bottom side anchor points and move them up, making the shape pointed and looking like a shield.

Use the Live Corners feature to make the sides of the shape smooth. We can also make the top of the shape slightly bend, using the Curvature Tool (Shift-‘).

Finish up with the badge by placing a star above it, using the Star Tool.

make the police officer badge
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Dress up our friendly police officer, adding a dark-grey tie and some additional details to the uniform. You can go even further and create some additional accessories, for example, bright trendy glasses, formed from two ellipses with a blue stroke.

finish up with the police officer

Great job! We’ve successfully created four portraits of people of different occupations that can be used either as avatars or as icons or for any other design project.

If you want to create more professions or to inspect the original file of this tutorial and see how the separate elements were made, then go ahead and get the full set of Flat Professions Avatars with 12 different occupations, each in two skin tones.

I really hope that this tutorial was helpful and you’ve discovered some new tips and tricks that will speed up your work, making it more comfortable.

Have fun and stay tuned for more!

flat professions avatars icons with portraits of people of different occupations

 

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MONDAY: December 4, 2017

CLASSROOM/COMPUTER LAB:

DESIGN THINKING IDEAS

Students will select a specific product (the brand) and write about it.  For example If it is a tennis shoe make it specific such as Nike, Air Jordan and model name.  First sketch the object and write about it in your sketchbook.

1. Sketch the image in your sketchbook

2. Describe the product

3. Talk about what you like about it

4. Talk about  the problems  you find with the product

5. Talk about what you  would do to improve it. After you have written this in your sketchbook write it in WORD and upload it to the website in the COMMENT section at the bottom of the page this week. 

CLASSWORK LAB: CONSTRUCTING A ROOM

Transferring the Floor Plan

1. Decide what scale you will build the model: 1/4 inch (1/4-inch scale means that on your model, 1/4 inch equals 1 foot), 1/8 inch or 1/16 inch.

2. Calculate the total dimensions of the model, based on scale. For instance, if you are building a model that is 40 by 30 feet at 1/4-inch scale, your model will be 10 by 7 1/2 inches. Your base should be about 12 by 9 1/2 inches or larger, leaving a 2-inch edge around the model.

3. Place the foam core on top of the cutting mat. Measure and mark the appropriate size shape for the base on the foam core using the T-square, adjustable triangle, architect scale and pencil with eraser. Place the straightedge along the area to be cut, and, using the utility knife, cut the base to size.

4. Draft a floor plan of the sketch dimensions onto the foam core base using the same materials. Include all door openings, hallways and windows. Remember to add a width for the walls. Six-inch-thick walls should be sufficient on the floor plan in most cases.

Step by Step Guide to Drawing House Elevations

Drawing Main Floor Wall Baseline

floor plan with front wall

To draw the initial baseline for the main floor,

1. Using your floor plan drawings and starting at the extreme left end of any walls on this side of the house on the ground floor, measure the horizontal distance of this wall. Make sure you are including the thickness of any siding material for the exterior side walls for this level. This siding can be very thin in the case of parging or thick in the case of stone or brick.

2.Draw a faint line the same length of this wall towards the bottom left third of your page. This faint horizontal line will later be erased since it will not be visible from the outside of the house (unless the exterior finish of the house changes at this exact point). It is drawn now only as a reference from which to measure to the top of the next floor or roof line.

3. Make a small upward tick mark at the end of this wall.

4. If there is another exterior wall at the same elevation to the right of this wall (for example a wall that bumps out or recedes in from this first wall), measure this wall in the same way as the first.

5. Draw this next line as a continuation of the first line. Do not erase the tick mark that indicates the division between these walls.

6. Continue on marking walls in this way until you reach the end of walls on this side of the house.

Determining and Drawing Wall Heights

elevation front wall

Next you will draw the vertical lines for the exterior walls on this side. For each of the wall bases:

1.Determine how high the wall will be above its unfinished floor height. To do this you will need to consider the height of the ceiling of the rooms within this section of the house and add to that the height of any floor or ceiling joists above it. Also add on the height of any sub-flooring, if there are floors above.

2. Draw faint vertical lines up from each of the wall base lines to the height you have determined in the previous step. (Later you will draw a darker line which includes the finished material on the outside of the home.)

3. Draw a faint horizontal line at the level of the upper ceiling joists or subfloor above this level.

4.  If there is another floor above this level, continue on to the step 5. Otherwise move on to the next section, Draw Window and Door Outlines.

5. Using the floor plans for the next level up, perform steps 1 through 3 again making tick marks where you will need to draw any vertical walls. Once again determine the heights of these walls then draw a faint horizontal line to show the level of the top of the sub-flooring or ceiling joists for the next level.

6. Continue repeating the above steps until you have no floors above the current level. Then move on to the next section, Draw Window and Door Outlines.

Draw Window and Door Outlines

elevation with windows and doors

For all of your windows and doors, measure from the horizontal lines of your floors to position the exterior doors and windows. Your construction drawings, usually the cross-sections, will detail the height at which each window should be placed. A separate window and door schedule gives the dimensions for all your windows and doors.

At this point, using your architect’s scale for accuracy, draw just the outline of the window and door outside dimensions to the same scale as your walls, floors and roof. Later you will draw the exterior window and door trim.

REFLECTION: WHAT DID YOU LEARN?

1. Where did you have problems?

2. Were you able to solve the problem and how did you go about it if you did.

3.  Talk about what could be a better solution to the problem.

TUESDAY: December 5, 2017

CLASSROOM/COMPUTER LAB:

DESIGN THINKING IDEAS

Students will select a specific product (the brand) and write about it.  For example If it is a tennis shoe make it specific such as Nike, Air Jordan and model name.  First sketch the object and write about it in your sketchbook.

1. Sketch the image in your sketchbook

2. Describe the product

3. Talk about what you like about it

4. Talk about  the problems  you find with the product

5. Talk about what you  would do to improve it. After you have written this in your sketchbook write it in WORD and upload it to the website in the COMMENT section at the bottom of the page this week. 

CLASSWORK LAB: CONSTRUCTING A ROOM

1. Sketch a layout of the entire home to be made into a model, including interior door openings, hallways and windows, with paper and pencil.

2. Measure the length and width of the interior of the first room with the tape measure by laying it on the floor from one end to the other. Record the exact measurements in feet and inches on the sketch.

3. Repeat Step 2 for each room in the home to be included in the model.

4. Measure each window, including distance from the floor and distance from the edge of the wall, with the tape measure. Record the exact measurements in feet and inches on the sketch.

5. Assuming a uniform ceiling height, measure the height of the interior walls by laying the tape measure against a wall from floor to ceiling. Record the exact measurement in feet and inches on the sketch.

Transferring the Floor Plan

1. Decide what scale you will build the model: 1/4 inch (1/4-inch scale means that on your model, 1/4 inch equals 1 foot), 1/8 inch or 1/16 inch.

2. Calculate the total dimensions of the model, based on scale. For instance, if you are building a model that is 40 by 30 feet at 1/4-inch scale, your model will be 10 by 7 1/2 inches. Your base should be about 12 by 9 1/2 inches or larger, leaving a 2-inch edge around the model.

3. Place the foam core on top of the cutting mat. Measure and mark the appropriate size shape for the base on the foam core using the T-square, adjustable triangle, architect scale and pencil with eraser. Place the straightedge along the area to be cut, and, using the utility knife, cut the base to size.

4. Draft a floor plan of the sketch dimensions onto the foam core base using the same materials. Include all door openings, hallways and windows. Remember to add a width for the walls. Six-inch-thick walls should be sufficient on the floor plan in most cases.

 WEDNESDAY: December 6, 2017

CLASSROOM DEMO: MODEL MAKING

Building the Model

1.Measure, mark and cut the foam core to the appropriate wall height for the first exterior wall using the straightedge, architect’s scale, utility knife and pencil with eraser.

2. Using the drafted floor plan on the base as a guide, mark off the appropriate length of the first exterior wall with the pencil. Remember to mark the location, width and height for any doors and windows.

3. Place the first foam core exterior wall on top of the cutting mat. Using the straightedge as a guide, cut the wall to length with the utility knife. Then, keeping the foam core wall on the cutting mat, follow the markings to cut out any windows and doors using the utility knife and straightedge.

4. Apply white glue to the edge of the first foam core exterior wall. Press firmly onto the base.

5. Using masking tape, secure the first wall by applying short strips at a 90-degree angle to the outside of the wall.

6. Continue Steps 1 through 4 for each wall, moving from one side of the model to the other, until the model is complete. Attach subsequent walls to each other with glue along the edges and apply masking tape to hold them in place.

7. Remove the masking tape after the glue dries and sets — about an hour.

Things You Will Need

• Paper

• Pencil with eraser

• Tape measure

• T-square

• Adjustable triangle

•  Architect scale

• 1/8-inch foam core (For ¼-inch scale model)

• Self-healing cutting mat

• Metal straightedge with cork backing

• Utility knife

• White glue

• Masking tape

Tip

Always cut at a 90-degree angle to make the edge of the foam core easier to glue to the base and adjacent pieces.

For a model with a nicer finish, consider using basswood.

Warning

Change blades often to maintain a sharp surface. It’s easier to cut the foam core and will help prevent accidental injuries.

RUBRIC FOR MODEL MAKING

 

 THURSDAY: December 7, 2017

CLASSROOM: MODEL MAKING

Building the Model

1.Measure, mark and cut the foam core to the appropriate wall height for the first exterior wall using the straightedge, architect’s scale, utility knife and pencil with eraser.

2. Using the drafted floor plan on the base as a guide, mark off the appropriate length of the first exterior wall with the pencil. Remember to mark the location, width and height for any doors and windows.

3. Place the first foam core exterior wall on top of the cutting mat. Using the straightedge as a guide, cut the wall to length with the utility knife. Then, keeping the foam core wall on the cutting mat, follow the markings to cut out any windows and doors using the utility knife and straightedge.

4. Apply white glue to the edge of the first foam core exterior wall. Press firmly onto the base.

5. Using masking tape, secure the first wall by applying short strips at a 90-degree angle to the outside of the wall.

6. Continue Steps 1 through 4 for each wall, moving from one side of the model to the other, until the model is complete. Attach subsequent walls to each other with glue along the edges and apply masking tape to hold them in place.

7. Remove the masking tape after the glue dries and sets — about an hour.

Things You Will Need

• Paper

• Pencil with eraser

• Tape measure

• T-square

• Adjustable triangle

•  Architect scale

• 1/8-inch foam core (For ¼-inch scale model)

• Self-healing cutting mat

• Metal straightedge with cork backing

• Utility knife

• White glue

• Masking tape

Tip

Always cut at a 90-degree angle to make the edge of the foam core easier to glue to the base and adjacent pieces.

For a model with a nicer finish, consider using basswood.

Warning

Change blades often to maintain a sharp surface. It’s easier to cut the foam core and will help prevent accidental injuries.

RUBRIC FOR MODEL MAKING

FRIDAY: December 8, 2017 

CLASSWORK LAB: 

Building the Model

1.Measure, mark and cut the foam core to the appropriate wall height for the first exterior wall using the straightedge, architect’s scale, utility knife and pencil with eraser.

2. Using the drafted floor plan on the base as a guide, mark off the appropriate length of the first exterior wall with the pencil. Remember to mark the location, width and height for any doors and windows.

3. Place the first foam core exterior wall on top of the cutting mat. Using the straightedge as a guide, cut the wall to length with the utility knife. Then, keeping the foam core wall on the cutting mat, follow the markings to cut out any windows and doors using the utility knife and straightedge.

4. Apply white glue to the edge of the first foam core exterior wall. Press firmly onto the base.

5. Using masking tape, secure the first wall by applying short strips at a 90-degree angle to the outside of the wall.

6. Continue Steps 1 through 4 for each wall, moving from one side of the model to the other, until the model is complete. Attach subsequent walls to each other with glue along the edges and apply masking tape to hold them in place.

7. Remove the masking tape after the glue dries and sets — about an hour.

Things You Will Need

• Paper

• Pencil with eraser

• Tape measure

• T-square

• Adjustable triangle

•  Architect scale

• 1/8-inch foam core (For ¼-inch scale model)

• Self-healing cutting mat

• Metal straightedge with cork backing

• Utility knife

• White glue

• Masking tape

Tip

Always cut at a 90-degree angle to make the edge of the foam core easier to glue to the base and adjacent pieces.

For a model with a nicer finish, consider using basswood.

Warning

Change blades often to maintain a sharp surface. It’s easier to cut the foam core and will help prevent accidental injuries.