Program Syllabus

Interior Design Program Syllabus

Interior design is an exciting profession that not only requires designers to be able to think creatively, but also to problem-solve. Interior designers are responsible for creating an environment for a structure, which may include a single-family home, government office, corporate headquarters, and everything in betweenIn order to create an interior environment, designers need to think about the form and functionality of the space. The form refers to the look and feel. The functionality refers to how they space will be practically used. In order to effectively blend form and functionality, designers need to rely upon many resources, guidelines, and professionals.

Interior designers often tend to be interior decorators. After all, designers are often responsible for all aspects of a project, including the design, development, and finishing touches. However, interior decorators may not necessarily be interior designers; designers need to have more in-depth knowledge than decorators.

While many interior designers are also decorators, designers do not generally take on other professional roles, such as plumber, carpenter, electrician, or otherwise. Therefore, designers must work closely with many other industry professionals.

Interior designers also have the liberty to be self-employed or to work with a firm. Either way, there are some business skills and best practices that every interior designer should use in order to be successful.

This course is designed to teach you how to be an interior designer by focusing on interior design from a macro level. If you decide to pursue an interior design career after reading about everything that will be required of you if you choose to pursue a career in interior design, then you will spend years learning the minute details that are essential to creating a successful design.

Note: This course focuses on all aspects of interior design. While interior decorating plays a large role in interior design, it is important to remember that the two are not the same. This course will not go into great detail about interior decorating, but, rather, will provide an overview of the kind of information interior designers will need to know.

 

INSTRUCTIONAL GOALS

[Insert brief overview of what will be covered in the class.]

 

At the end of this course, you will [Insert bulleted instructional goals below.]

  • know…
  • be able to…
  • understand…

 

NEEDS AND RESOURCES

Required Background

To successfully complete this course, you must [Insert bulleted prerequisite skills, instruction, and/or information]

  • know
  • be able to…
  • understand

 

STUDENT ATTENDANCE REVIEW BOARD

The Attendance Review Board is comprised of the principal, the attendance administrator, 2 teachers, and the attendance secretary.  The purpose is to review class attendance problems and mitigate excessive absences. The goal is to increase the class attendance rate to 95%.

STUDENTS WHO MISS 10%, OR MORE (10 DAILY OR 5 BLOCK CLASSES) WILL LOSE CREDIT FOR THAT CLASS. TO HAVE THE CREDIT RESTORED, THE STUDENT MUST APPEAL TO THE SCHOOL ATTENDANCE REVIEW BOARD (SARB), RECEIVE A FAVORABLE RULING FROM THE BOARD AND RECEIVE A PASSING GRADE FOR THE CLASS FROM THE TEACHER. STUDENTS IN ATTENDANCE LESS THAN 90% OF THE CLASS TIME WITH 10 DAILY OR 5 BLOCK UNEXCUSED ABSENCES, CANNOT APPEAL THE CLASS TO THE SARB.

 

The administrator, in charge of attendance, has the authority to grant exceptions to the attendance policy for excessive absences if there are extenuating circumstances. Absences for the following reasons will not be included in the absence total:
  1. While participating in a school sponsored activity
  2. While on suspension
  3. Pre-arranged college visits (junior and senior only)
 
HOMEWORK 
Student success is largely dependent on the committed effort and the establishment of good individual and group work and study habits. We recommend that students consider carefully when and where they will study and practice. Teachers should expect students to be engaged in homework assignments, rehearsals/practice, or other study beyond the school day.
 
HOMEWORK POLICY
Fort Hayes has a zero tolerance for lack of effort.  Each department is expected to develop, post, and enforce a procedure for addressing repeated lack of effort. Work assigned to the student beyond the normal school day must be meaningful.  In addition, homework should be seen as an extension of class work and not as an introduction to new material.  We want to set our students up for success.

The expectation is to assign meaningful homework which is considered an extension of the regular classroom work. This may include:

  • A specific assignment by the teacher for all students or individual students.

  • Carry-over work begun in the regular classroom.

  • Student self-directed study as an adjunct to units of work being carried on in the regular classroom.

  • Enrichment of a youngster’s learning, either self-directed or teacher-directed which does not necessarily pertain to specific classroom lessons.

 

PURPOSE OF HOMEWORK

The purpose of homework is the following:

1.       To offer additional practice and drill in needed skills as identified and evaluated by the teachers.

2.       To develop responsibilities for completing assigned tasks.

3.       To increase the student’s ability to engage in self-directed activities stimulated by the school.

4.       To encourage broadening of natural curiosity for learning.

5.       To begin to establish good working habits for later use in advanced and more complex courses where additional work can only be completed outside the regular classroom.

6.        To inform the parent or guardian of the course content and progress of his/her child.

 

Teachers shall develop and make available to parents the homework requirements. In assigning homework, teachers shall take into account the need for appropriate balance in the pupil’s school and out-of-school activities.

RESTRICTED LIST 

Any student that has one very low grade due to no effort being put forth or failing grade at mid-quarter and/or at the end of the quarter will be placed on the restricted list for ten school days.  This means that any student on this list will not be able to leave their classroom (except for extreme emergency) or study hall for any reason.  At the end of ten days all students will have the opportunity to have their teacher sign them off saying that they have improved their grade.  If the student’s grade has not improved, they will stay on the restricted list until the grade has been improved.

Required Materials

To successfully complete this course, you will need :

  • Sketchbook (wire ring or bound – 100 pages)
  • Jump-drive (at least 2Gs)

 

COURSE SCHEDULE

 

[Insert planned course outline — with dates, if possible. Include topics to be covered (and their order), scheduled quizzes and exams, long-term assignment due dates, and such special events as field trips and guest lecturers.]

 

 

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

 

General Rules:

[Insert explanation of classroom rules and procedures, including such topics as attitude, behavior, attendance, tardiness, incomplete work, and so on. Describe rules <I>and</I> consequences.]

 

HALL PASSES

If a student leaves your class or area, he/she must have a newly signed hall pass.  Please write in ink.  No passes should be issued during the first and last 10 minutes of a class period except in cases of emergency.  The purpose of the pass is to assure students that we are monitoring where they are at all times.  Our students follow our example as adults; we must take this matter seriously if we expect them to do so.  Remember that this issue is for the safety of the student and protects teachers in the event that a student makes a poor choice.  Cameras are installed in specific areas of the school to monitor the activity of the school day.  Students who are out of area without a proper pass should be referred to the office for a consequence.  If a teacher desires to have a pupil excused from the regularly assigned location for an entire period, the requesting teacher issues a “Please Excuse” slip to the student.  The student brings the properly-signed form to the teacher at the beginning of the period and then reports immediately to the room indicated on the slip.  It is the requesting teacher’s responsibility to see that the student reports to him/her promptly.  No student shall be given a excuse to miss another teachers class without the written consent of both teacher.

 

Issuing Passes

  • Teachers will write pass in the student’s handbook when a pupil leaves the room for any reason.
  • Fill out the pass completely: date, time, destination and teacher’s signature.
  • Students are not to be given passes to go to the telephone or their lockers.
  • Students without passes will be returned to the teacher.
  • Boards, sticks, “permanent” passes are not acceptable.

 

Framework for Communicating Classroom Expectations ACHIEVE:

 

  • ACTIVITY What is the activity being defined? (Lecture, independent work, cooperative groups, etc.)
  • CONVERSATION Under what circumstances, if at all, can students talk to each other during the activity? If they can during this activity, with whom can they speak, about what and for how long?
  • HELP How do students get their questions answered during the activity? How do they get your attention? What should they do while they are waiting for your help?
  • INTEGRITY What are your expectations regarding students doing their own work and avoiding copying work or plagiarizing sources?
  • EFFORT What does appropriate student work behavior during the activity look like? For classes needing high structure, identify under which circumstances, if any, students can move about during the activity. For example, can they sharpen a pencil?
  • VALUE How will participation in this activity be of value to students? Explain to your students how their efforts will contribute to their success in your class.
  • EFFICIENCY What tips or suggestions can you give students for getting maximum benefit from this activity?

 

 

Grading Policies:

[Insert explanation of class grading policy. Describe how work will be graded and how final grades will be determined. Include a discussion of the relative importance of daily work, homework, long-term assignments, exams, quizzes, and class discussions. Also describe extra credit policies and procedures, attendance and tardiness sanctions, and so on.]

 

GRADING

  • 70 % of grade is  on completion of assignments and projects
  • 3o % is on attendance, meeting deadlines,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grading Scale:

[If applicable, insert grading scale, linking number and letter grades.]

 

 

 

Grading Scale

During the 1991-1992 school year, the Promotion/Retention Committee recommended to the Reform Panel that the following grading scale would be the minimum grading scale recommended for use. The Reform Panel accepted this recommendation.

90 – 100 = A

80 – 89 = B

70 – 79 = C

60 – 69 = D

59 – below = F

If a school chooses to use a higher scale, the Director of High School/Curriculum Leadership and Development must be notified.

 

 

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

[Insert additional information, specific to your school, class, students, or topic.]

 

 

 

 

SCHOOL-WIDE DISCIPLINARY PLAN

TARDY POLICY

CLASS CUTTING POLICY

 

STEP 1:  1ST TARDY:

  • Teacher gives verbal warning and reminds student of the Tardy Policy.

STEP 2:  2ND TARDY:

  • Teachers gives verbal warning to student and contacts parent within

48 hours.

  • Teacher assigns student to Intervention Workshop.
  • Teacher may also assign lunch detention, if so desired.

STEP 3:  3RD TARDY AND BEYOND

Teacher fills out an Office Referral (190) and documents the two previous interventions on the referral. 

STEP1:  1ST CUT

  • Teacher submits Office Referral Form (190) before the next time

the student has the class, i.e., 48 hours (Teacher includes

“Recommend Intervention Workshop” on the form).

  • Teacher calls parent to notify them of the cut and writes this on

the line under “Previous Corrective Measures” on the Office

Referral Form.

STEP 2:  ALL SUBSEQUENT CUTS

  • Teacher writes the Office Referral listing the “Previous Corrective Measures”:

 

  • Repeated behavior, parent conference, Office Referral, intervention workshop.

INSUBORDINATION

CLASS DISRUPTION

Refusal to follow directions.May include verbal abuse from a student to a teacher.

STEP 1

  • Teacher conferences with student, one-on-one.

STEP 2

  • Teacher writes Office Referral with documented intervention.
  • Teacher calls home within 24 hours.
  • Student does not return to the class the same period.
  • Student is assigned Intervention Workshop.

STEP 3

Teacher writes office Referral with documented intervention

Any behavior which impedes the learning process ofother students:

STEP 1:  1ST DISRUPTION

  • Teacher redirects student and reminds him/her of the class

disruption policy.

STEP 2:  2ND DISRUPTION

  • Teacher conferences with student one-on-one, i.e., hallway, or at

desk.

STEP 3:  3RD DISRUPTION

(could be on the same day or consecutive days)

  • Teacher makes phone conference to parent within 24 hours.

STEP 4:  4TH DISRUPTION

  • Teacher writes Office Referral, documenting previous

intervention.

  • Student is assigned Intervention Workshop.

STEP 5:  SUBSEQUENT DISRUPTIONS

Teacher writes Office Referral, documenting previous intervention.

ELECTRONIC DEVICES

EXTREME CLASS DISRUPTION/INSUBORDINATION:CELL PHONES

  • If we see or hear them, we taken them.  Students’ cell phones may

not be visible or audible.

  • Teachers will get the phone processed and to  Mr. Ruffin at their

earliest convenience.

STEP 1:  FIRST OFFENSE

  • Student may retrieve the cell phone from Mr. Ruffin after processing.

STEP 2:  SECOND OFFENSE

  • Parents may pick up the cell phone/electronic device from

Mr. Ruffin after processing.

STEP 3:  THIRD OFFENSE

  • Student may get the cell phone/electronic device at the end of  the

school year.

 

**FAILURE TO RELINQUISH DEVICE WHEN  REQUESTED

    WILL RESULT IN STEPS FOR  INSUBORDINATION.**

 

The RED EMERGENCY PASS will be used in only the direst of circumstances.  An extremely disruptive student must leave the class, go to Mr. Ruffin’s office, and wait.  This student will not return to class the same day.  A call will be made to the principal’s office to advise of the student’s expected arrival with the RED PASS.  An Office Referral will follow as soon as possible.

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

 

  • [Insert name and title/grade level]
  • [Insert phone number and hours of availability]
  • [Insert email address]
  • [Insert class URL]

 

 

 

Student Signature: _____________________________________ Date: ______

 

 

Parent Signature:   _____________________________________ Date: ______

 

Course Requirements

Anyone interested in this field is welcome to join this course. We will provide many tips and guides that will be of help to anyone interested.  The only thing you’ll need is to be creative, analytical, discipline and passionate about design.

Course Topics

 Lesson 1. Introduction to Interior Design.

  1. What is interior design?
  2. Interior designers work with professionals in many other fields.
  3. How do interior decorators and interior designers compare?
  4. Interior design specialties

Lesson 2. Evolution of Design

  1. The evolution of form and function (form and function lecture ppt)
  2. What we can learn from cave dwellings
  3. Architects are the original interior designers
  4. The Industrial Revolution made mainstream interior design possible.
  5. The establishment of interior design schools and associations

Lesson 3. Basic Interior Design Decorating Principles.

  1. Before a project begins, it is important to be able to visualize how it will be decorated.
  2. Designers and clients need to have a shared understanding
    1. Color
    2. Texture
    3. Paint
    4. Wall coverings
    5. Upholstery
    6. Accessories
    7. Flooring
    8. Lighting
    9. Furniture

10.Function

11.Size

12.Materials

13.Style

14.Additional decorating elements

Lesson 4. Color

  1. The science of color
  2. Color wheel
  3. Primary and secondary colors
  4. Customized color palette
    1. Complementary color combinations include:
  5. Color qualities
  6. Contrasting colors
  7. Contrasting color combinations include:
  8. Color psychology
  9. Color and Feng shui
  10. Color finishes
  11. Color in design styles

Lesson 5. Major Design Styles.

  1. The importance of studying styles
  2. Major interior design styles and influences:

Lesson 6. Design Codes

Codes

  1. National and international codes
  2. State codes
  3. Interior design certification and licensing
  4. Legislation and advocacy

Lesson 7. Standards

  1. What is a standard?
  2. Interior design standards
  3. Standards for accrediting interior designers

Lesson 8. Licensing and Certification

  1. Interior design requirements for certification
  2. Specialty Certifications
  3. Title laws regulating interior designers

Lesson 9. Areas of Specialization

  1. Corporate
  2. Government
  3. Healthcare
  4. Hospitality
  5. Residential
  6. Retail

Lesson 10. LEED Building Certification

  1. What is LEED?
  2. LEED building  certification

Lesson 11. LEED Professional Certification

  1. What you’ll need to know
  2. Business benefits of LEED certification
  3. Types of LEED certifications

Lesson 12. Bodies of Knowledge

  1. Professional practice
  2. Design
  3. Products and materials
  4. Interior construction, codes, and regulations
  5. Communication
  6. Human environment needs

Lesson 13. 10 Things Every Professional Interior Designer Should do to Have a Successful Business

  1. 10 things you should do to stay in business as an interior designer
  2. Make it legal.
  3. Make it official.
  4. Maintain your portfolio.
  5. Market your services.
  6. Establish a niche.
  7. Stay current.
  8. Do a deep dive.
  9. Maintain constant contact.
  10. Follow-up.
  11. Stay unique.

 

  1. Interior design business checklist

Lesson 14. Interior Design Associations

  1. An overview of interior design associations

Lesson 15. Resources for Interior Designers

  1. State and local government offices
  2. Websites
  3. Magazines
  4. Consumer Magazines
  5. Trade Magazines

 

Course Materials

All course materials are provided in this class. There is no need to buy additional resources

Grading Policy

Each lesson will include a written assignment and/or brief quiz that will directly apply what you have learned.Final grades will follow this outline:
– 90- 100 A
– 80- 89 B
– 70- 79 C
– below 70 will be an F
Students will successfully complete this course with 70% or better.